• NOS4A2
    3.8k


    We’ve been conditioned to believe words and thoughts can affect a listener in ways beyond simple physics. We are taught that, though a word can barely move a blade of grass, it can cause pain and anxiety and stress in human beings. We should rid ourselves of this magical thinking because it gives power to those who would use thoughts and words against us. Rather, we should learn that this pain, anxiety and stress is caused by, finds it’s genesis within, the listener, and seek ways to mitigate and strengthen them for future interactions.
  • Jack Cummins
    69
    To Dimensional 72:
    What you are saying is essentially true and is exactly the underlying philosophy of cognitive behavioral therapy. It is our perception of others' opinions that affect us rather than the opinions themselves. It is magical thinking if we believe that their opinions affect us directly.
    However, the individual quest to be free of caring about the opinions is not easy. In the first place we do not always know the opinions completely because they are sometimes expressed directly but are sometimes barely expressed at all or in bits and pieces. So, sometimes the opinions we are so affected by are not even true. I know people who are elated by what they believe others think of them and know that the beliefs in the so- called wonderful opinions are in fact delusional. The most obvious example would be those who believe another is in love with them when that is not true. But I would not suggest trying to shatter the happiness of fantasies about others good opinions unless you really need to do so, unless of course one is a trained therapist and knows exactly what one is doing and why.
    But while I agree that other people people 's opinion do not affect us directly I still maintain that it is extremely difficult to liberate ourselves entirely from any regard for these opinions, or our perceived notions of these opinions, because we are social creatures fundamentally. The human ego is fragile, affected from experience from birth, and to overcome this sensitivity is difficult. People who lack any sensitivity to others might be more damaged. The people on the extreme end of the autistic scale, who often have little awareness of others' mental processes can end up having little regard for others feelings and treat others with disregard. So, our sensitivity should not be eroded too much.
  • unenlightened
    5.1k
    If Hitler thinks you're Jew, he won't care what you think; and whether you care or not about what he thinks, it's off to the gas chamber you go. Not having to care what others think about you is a privilege of power.
  • Ansiktsburk
    77
    If Hitler thinks you're Jew, he won't care what you think; and whether you care or not about what he thinks, it's off to the gas chamber you go. Not having to care what others think about you is a privilege of power.unenlightened
    Off you go to USA before Hitler takes you, then you can start giving a damn again. Wouldn't go as far as saying "privilege of power". More, just make sure you can take the shit that comes with not caring - if you let the uncaring show. You can do the Heil arm thing without caring too much.
  • JerseyFlight
    776
    If Hitler thinks you're Jew, he won't care what you think; and whether you care or not about what he thinks, it's off to the gas chamber you go. Not having to care what others think about you is a privilege of power.unenlightened

    It is precisely the duty of philosophy to combat and prevent this kind of viciousness in the world.
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