• Gregory
    144
    I was thinking recently that Heidegger might give a justification to science. If scientists are greatly in tune with matter's being (it reveals its "region" to them), maybe they understand it in ways Hume-ans don't. Hume had a mentality prominent in the East, which I consider spiritual. Reconciling it with Being and Time is difficult for me
  • Wayfarer
    8.8k
    . If scientists are greatly in tune with matter's being...Gregory

    matter only 'has being' when appears in human form. That's why we're 'beings' and things, just 'things'.

    In regards to the nature of matter, science has built the largest, most complex, and most expensive apparatus in the history of the world to investigate it, and there are many more questions than answers.
  • Gregory
    144
    I think Hume thought motion was mysterious because of Parmenides
  • TheMadFool
    4.1k
    I think Hume thought motion was mysterious because of ParmenidesGregory

    Why?
  • Gregory
    144
    Hume said he disagreed with Zeno but he therefore seemed to know about that school of thought
  • Gregory
    144
    https://aeon.co/essays/the-logic-of-budd hist-philosophy-goes-beyond-simple-truth
  • Gregory
    144
    Notice the first quote from nagarjuna. He was the easts parmenides. I see Hume as the forerunner to Schopenhauer's emptiness. Didn't they both like Buddhism?
  • Gregory
    144
    Hume denied that the self and material substance make ncessary sense. He called the connection to the world "a species of instinct or mechanical power. He started a Buddhist type of psychological introspection. For him, no theory of reality is possible
  • jamalrob
    2.1k
    matter only 'has being' when appears in human form. That's why we're 'beings' and things, just 'things'.Wayfarer

    People have pointed out to you a few times before just how idiosyncratic your use of "being" is, at least in philosophy. This discussion is partly about about Heidegger, and Heidegger uses the term being in the traditional Aristotelian sense: a being is something that can be said to be. Being is about existence.
  • Wayfarer
    8.8k
    Someone took exception when I pointed out that the word 'ontology' is derived from the first-person participle of the Greek 'ouisia', which is the verb 'to be'. So the first-person participle of the verb 'to be' is 'I am'. This, I maintain, is significant, and not idiosyncratic in the least, as it indicates that ontology is concerned with the nature of being, in a way that is unintelligible to the perspective of the objective sciences, on the grounds that 'the nature of being' is never an object of awareness.

    Heidegger uses the term being in the traditional Aristotelian sense: a being is something that can be said to be. Being is about existence.jamalrob

    There's a phrase often used in relation to Heidegger's philosophy: forgetfulness of _______ .

    What is the word that is commonly used in this context?
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