• T Clark
    4.2k
    I contributed to some confusion in @Wayfarer's "Word de jour" discussion by misunderstanding its purpose. I liked the idea though, so here it is. At a place I used to work, there was a whiteboard in the lunch room. Every day someone would put up a new word of the day and we'd discuss it. I used to enjoy it. Gotta love words.

    The words I used in Wayfarer's discussion were "gregarious" and "craptacular." "Gregarious" because it feels good to say and "craptacular" because it is the perfect word.

    My word for today is "woebegone." - looking sad, pitiful. A friend was having a bad day yesterday and I described her this way. Feels good to say. Elicits an image in my mind of whomever I am talking about with an expression like Eeyore's. Reminds me of German - they build their words like brick walls, one word on top of another. Love German.

    So, please contribute. Let's keep it to English. That odd English they speak in the UK, Australia, Canadia, etc. is fine. Words you love. Words you hate.
  • Noble Dust
    3.9k
    I like “recalcitrant”. I like recalcitrant people, and I count myself among their number.
  • T Clark
    4.2k
    I like “recalcitrant”. I like recalcitrant people, and I count myself among their number.Noble Dust

    I like "recalcitrant" people too, although I sometimes use a more vulgar word. The word feels good to say also.
  • Baden
    10.8k
    Tenebrous.

    Came up regularly in a book I once edited and I had to look it up. It still sounds to me to be the opposite of what it is. But maybe that's just me.
  • fdrake
    4.2k
    Bucolic. Sounds very sinister, means pleasantly rural.
  • T Clark
    4.2k

    Bucolic. Sounds very sinister, means pleasantly rural.
    fdrake

    Yeah - sounds like a disease. Or maybe a brassica - you know, broccoli, cabbage, brussels sprouts, bucolic.
  • T Clark
    4.2k
    Tenebrous.Baden

    Here's a quote using "tenebrous" I tripped across while looking up its definition. From Lovecraft; "Dunwich Horror":

    One dreads to trust the tenebrous tunnel of the bridge, yet there is no way to avoid it. Once across, it is hard to prevent the impression of a faint, malign odour about the village street, as of the massed mould and decay of centuries.
  • Noble Dust
    3.9k


    Lovecraft’s writing is a guilty pleasure of mine.
  • Bitter Crank
    8.9k
    Brassicas are also referenced as 'coles'; cole slaw is a cabbage salad. Old King Cole was a cabbage head.

    Old King Cabbage was a sharp witted savage
    and a sharp witted savage was he.
    He called for his pipe, he called for his stash
    and he called for his brass players three.

    He wanted to be chopped, and then be slopped
    with mayonnaise, sugar, and cream.
    Cole, apples and bananas, odd it may seem,
    for a fine supper salad can't be topped.

    'Cole' appears in Latin, German, Dutch, and Old Norse, and Old English.
  • T Clark
    4.2k
    Brassicas are also referenced as 'coles'; cole slaw is a cabbage salad. Old King Cole was a cabbage head.

    Old King Cabbage was a sharp witted savage
    and a sharp witted savage was he.
    He called for his pipe, he called for his stash
    and he called for his brass players three.

    He asked to be chopped, and then be slopped
    with mayonnaise, sugar, and cream.
    Cole, apples and bananas, odd it may seem,
    for a fine supper salad can't be topped.
    Bitter Crank

    I forgot to say "No doggerel," another good word. Although it means verse or words that are badly written or expressed, it aught to mean the fenced area where dogs are kept before the big drive to Abilene.
  • T Clark
    4.2k
    I forgot to say "No doggerel," another good word. Although it means verse or words that are badly written or expressed, it aught to mean the fenced area where dogs are kept before the big drive to Abilene.T Clark

    Or maybe it can be used in a sentence like "@ArguingWAristotleTiff and @TimeLine, what a couple of doggerels.
  • Noble Dust
    3.9k


    Is that a variant of dogatory?
  • Bitter Crank
    8.9k
    Oh, did you know "aught" means anything at all? As in "know you aught of this fellow, young sir?" You were probably thinking of "ought" as in "you can't derive an 'is' from an 'ought', or 'aught' either.

    Old English āwiht

    Antique now, but it also means 'zero'.

    Doggerel indeed! My doggerel is bigger than your doggerel.
  • SophistiCat
    1.4k
    My word for today is "woebegone." - looking sad, pitiful.T Clark

    That's a word that sounds right, but a naive parsing suggests a meaning that is the opposite of what it actually means. Woe - be gone! But, according to Dictionary.com, the etymology is "Middle English wo begon orig., woe (has or had) surrounded (someone); wo woe + begon, past participle of begon, Old English begān to surround, besiege".

    It's been a quiet week in Lake Wobegon...

    Tenebrous.

    Came up regularly in a book I once edited and I had to look it up. It still sounds to me to be the opposite of what it is. But maybe that's just me.
    Baden

    To speakers of Slavic languages it should sound just right: the first syllable stands of "shadow" or "darkness."


    A word that I often encountered in Falkner, and practically nowhere else, is susurrating. Now that's a word that doesn't even need an explanation.
  • Baden
    10.8k
    To speakers of Slavic languages it should sound just right: the first syllable stands of "shadow" or "darkness."SophistiCat

    Latin roots though, right? I would guess. Anyway, it reminds me phonically too much of its opposite, "luminous".
  • T Clark
    4.2k
    You were probably thinking of "ought" as in "you can't derive an 'is' from an 'ought', or 'aught' either.Bitter Crank

    Thanks for the correction.


    My doggerel is bigger than your doggerel.Bitter Crank

    I don't have a doggerel. Maybe my pen is bigger than yours though.
  • Bitter Crank
    8.9k
    Related word: tenebrae: (in the Roman Catholic Church) matins and lauds for the last three days of Holy Week, at which candles are successively extinguished. Several composers have set parts of the office to music.

    craptacularT Clark

    Craptacular is excellent, but don't forget "crapulous", from Latin crapulosus

    Caused by or showing the effects of alcohol.
    ‘I was a little too crapulous to register what had happened’
    ‘I'm surprised to see Graham spouting crapulous nonsense like this’

    Then there is plain old crap which is, sadly, not derived from crapulous or crapulosus;

    Crap, of course, means crap.

    noun
    noun: crap
    1.
    something of extremely poor quality.
    nonsense.
    rubbish; junk.
    2.
    excrement.
    an act of defecation.
    plural noun: craps
    verb
    verb: crap; 3rd person present: craps; past tense: crapped; past participle: crapped; gerund or present participle: crapping

    Used in an obscure novelty song, "I Crept Into the Crypt and Crapped" by Homer & Jethro"
  • T Clark
    4.2k
    excrement.Bitter Crank

    I'm disappointed. I had believed the word came from Thomas Crapper, who manufactured toilets back in the late1800s.
  • T Clark
    4.2k
    Word of the day - Saturday March 17, 2018.

    My son's 28th birthday.

    Word - whippersnapper

    Official definition - A young and inexperienced person considered to be presumptuous or overconfident.

    My definition - Anyone more than 10 years younger than I am.
  • Benkei
    3.5k
    Effervescent is one of my favourites.
  • T Clark
    4.2k
    Effervescent is one of my favourites.Benkei
    Tonto monto pee ick? Close anyway.
  • unenlightened
    5.2k
    The word 'tremendously' is tremendously important and valuable and I am tremendously fond of it. Unfortunately, due to quantitive easing, it now means 'very slightly'.

    Origin
    Mid 17th century: from Latin tremendus (gerundive of tremere ‘tremble’) + -ous.
    — oxford dictionaries.com

    Everyone loves a gerundive, surely?
  • unenlightened
    5.2k
    In other news, the word 'dispute' used to have the emphasis on the second syllable in line with 'discard' and 'dismiss', and out of line with discord. But thanks to the tireless efforts of one man, Arthur Scargill, it has seemingly irrevocably changed allegiance. That's what you can expect more of with the triumph of Postmodern neo-Marxism, so don't pretend you haven't been warned.
  • S
    11.8k
    Tenebrous.Baden

    I can get a little tenebrous after I've had a few beers.

    I forgot to say "No doggerel," another good word.T Clark

    I like the way you work it, no doggerel, I got to bag it up, bag it up.

    Effervescent is one of my favourites.Benkei

    Bring me to life, wake me up inside, wake me up inside, call my name...
  • charleton
    1.2k
    Vicissitudes is a cracker of a word.

    I regard the calumnies I have to suffer to read are amongst the worse of the Vicissitudes encountered on this Forum.
  • T Clark
    4.2k
    The word 'tremendously' is tremendously important and valuable and I am tremendously fond of it. Unfortunately, due to quantitive easing, it now means 'very slightly'.unenlightened

    It's a word, like "terrific" or "awesome", that used to refer to something frightening or overpowering but now refers to something really good.
  • TimeLine
    2.7k
    Or maybe it can be used in a sentence like "@ArguingWAristotleTiff and TimeLine, what a couple of doggerels.T Clark

    What the.
  • T Clark
    4.2k
    What the.TimeLine

    My excuse is that I was drinking. It seemed funny at the time. Actually, it seems funny to me now. But then again, I'm drinking now.
  • TimeLine
    2.7k
    My excuse is that I was drinking. It seemed funny at the time. Actually, it seems funny to me now. But then again, I'm drinking now.T Clark

    Quite. Well, I do not drink alcohol so I have no excuse... you bumberclat. Nevertheless!

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