• Maw
    1k
    The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  • frank
    1.7k
    The Enneads by Plotinus
    Little Dorrit
  • ArguingWAristotleTiff
    3.2k
    Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman
  • darthbarracuda
    2.9k
    On the Fourfold Root of the Principle of Sufficient Reason by Arthur Schopenhauer.
  • Maw
    1k
    @StreetlightX any books about Time that you would recommend? Anything general would be great, but also specific to a Marxist interpretation would be of interest as well. I'm reading E.P. Thompson's paper on Time, Work-Discipline and Industrial Capitalism, and it's fascinating.
  • StreetlightX
    3.1k
    Hmm, I've never really approached questions of time 'directly' - generally it's through other lenses (X's or Y's take on time) - and there's nothing I know that is quite so 'concrete/historical' as anything Thompson would have written. The closest thing I can think of is a great essay by Isabelle Stengers and Didier Gille on time keeping devices and their social effects (look in your PMs!).

    Otherwise, David Couzens Hoy's The Time of Our Lives is a great overview of different 'continental' approaches to time which I really like.

    Elizabeth Grosz's two books, The Nick of Time and Time Travels, might be somewhat closer to what you've looking for, but they're more 'how to think about time and politics', and again, not anything like that Thompson essay (also, they're both essay collections themselves).

    Henri Lefevbe's Rhythmanalysis might be even closer (Lefebvre being a Marxist sociologist), but it's a short book that deals more with rhythm than it does with 'time' as such.

    Errr, otherwise, there's Poalo Virno's Déjà Vu and the End of History which I haven't read, but looks very much like something that matches what you're after.

    Sciency-wise there's Lee Smolin's Time Reborn and Ilya Prigogine's The End of Certainty, which are superb (no politics at all!).

    My last reccomendation might seem strange but is one of my favorite books I've ever read and has influenced me massively when thinking about time - Martin Hagglund's Radical Atheism: Derrida and the Time of Life, which strictly speaking is a (very clear!) reading of Derrida on time, but which I think is absolutely super as a stand-alone book on time in general.

    But yeah, this is all a very random scattering of things off the top of my head. Time is always something I've approached 'sideways on', so these recc's may not be the best/most relevant, but yeah.
  • StreetlightX
    3.1k
    Paolo Virno - A Grammar of the Multitude: For an Analysis of Contemporary Forms of Life
    Giorgio Agamben - The Use of Bodies (The ninth and final book of the Homo Sacer series!)
  • StreetlightX
    3.1k
    Mark Fisher - Capitalist Realism
    Paolo Virno - When The Word Becomes Flesh: Language and Human Nature
    Paolo Virno - Essay on Negation: For a Linguistic Anthropology
  • darthbarracuda
    2.9k
    Varieties of Religious Experience by William James
    After Finitude by Quentin Meillassoux (re-read, never finished previously)
    The Basic Kafka by Kafka
    The Trouble With Being Born & Drawn and Quartered by Cioran
  • Maw
    1k
    :up: for Cioran and AF

    Capital V2 by Marx
  • StreetlightX
    3.1k
    Daniel Dor - The Instruction of Imagination: Language as a Social Communication Technology
  • StreetlightX
    3.1k
    Moira Gatens and Genevieve Lloyd - Collective Imaginings: Spinoza, Past and Present
    Brian Rotman - Ad Infinitum... The Ghost in Turing's Machine: Taking God Out of Mathematics and Putting the Body Back In. An Essay in Corporeal Semiotics
  • Maw
    1k
    Gonna start Dracula by Bram Stoker tomorrow, because it's a S P O O K Y month
  • frank
    1.7k
    The History of Money By Jack Weatherford

    This is is one of the best books I've read in a while. It contains sentences like: "The ancient ruins of the Imperial Age lie scattered across the center of modern Rome like whale bones that have washed up on a rocky shore and been picked clean by the birds and rodents that make their nests and burrows amid the debris."

    Whale bones. Plus its author is a hero of the Mongolians. Awesome.
  • Pattern-chaser
    544
    "A discovery of witches" by Deborah Harkness. I love a good story!
  • StreetlightX
    3.1k
    Etienne Balibar - Spinoza and Politics
    Brian Rotman - Signifying Nothing: The Semiotics of Zero
    Brian Rotman - Mathematics as Sign: Writing, Imagining, Counting
    Brian Rotman - Becoming Beside Ourselves: The Alphabet, Ghosts, and Distributed Human Being

    On a bit of a Rotman/Spinoza kick.
  • Maw
    1k
    Etienne Balibar - Spinoza and PoliticsStreetlightX

    This has been on my radar for some time. Can you let me know what you think?
  • StreetlightX
    3.1k
    So I'm about half-way through and I'm liking it alot. The title 'Spinoza and Politics' is actually deliciously ambiguous: it refers not just to 'Spinoza's political theory', but quite literally, the politics of Spinoza's time, and how the political events of the day in Dutch republic profoundly shaped Spinoza's writing. It's also fairly lucid, and treats the both of the Tractati as seriously as it treats the Ethics, treating the whole oeuvre holistically, rather than distinguishing between a 'metaphysical' and 'political' Spinoza. It's fairly fast-paced, and condenses alot in a small space, which makes it a very rich read. Good if you want a study that brings out the uniqueness of Spinoza's approach and situates it with respect to his time.
  • ProbablyTrue
    188
    What do you do for work? How do you have so much time to read? Are you just a better steward of time than the average person? You make me feel like the lazy procrastinator I am.
  • StreetlightX
    3.1k
    Heh, you'll be surprised how much you can get through if you set aside just an hour of undistracted reading a day. Like, if it takes about 2 hours to read a chapter (conservative estimate), and if a book (of philosophy) is usually between 4-7 chapters, you can almost certainly get through a book and a bit a week. Once you develop the habit, it's very possible.
  • StreetlightX
    3.1k
    Damien Cahill & Phillip Toner (eds.) - Wrong Way: How Privatisation & Economic Reform Backfired

    Essays by various authors on the Australian context specifically, covering everything from healthcare to education to public engineering projects. I've been looking for a book like this for about a year now, and this is perfect.
  • SophistiCat
    534
    How do you have so much time to read?ProbablyTrue

    Heh, you'll be surprised how much you can get through if you set aside just an hour of undistracted reading a day.StreetlightX

    Good reading skills must help too. I too set aside some reading time, usually more than one hour per day, but there is no way I could get through an average-sized book in a week, especially a philosophy book.

    (I read mostly fiction though. Currently finishing Javier Marías's A Heart So White in English translation. It is a fairly slim book, as novels go, but it still took me a couple of weeks.)
  • StreetlightX
    3.1k
    Walter Ong - Orality and Literacy: The Technologizing of the Word
    Giorgio Agamben - What is an Apparatus? And Other Essays
    Fernando Zalamea - Synthetic Philosophy of Contemporary Mathematics
    Fernando Zalamea - Peirce's Logic of Continuity: A Conceptual and Mathematical Approach
  • Valentinus
    66
    Spinoza's Ethics (part 1 and 2)
    Maybe it is bullshit. But it so successfully circumvents other peoples' bullshit that it gets my attention.
  • LD Saunders
    314
    Innate How the Wiring of Our Brains Shapes Who We Are, by Kevin J. Mitchell, Princeton and Oxford, 2018.
  • darthbarracuda
    2.9k
    Whatever by Michel Houellebecq.
    Pensieri by Giacomo Leopardi.
  • Apey
    2
    Why i Assassinated Gandhi by Gopal Godse
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