• Pantagruel
    1.9k
    De Anima
    by Aristotle
  • jamalrob
    3.2k
    Well, as promised, I read Dune. A remarkable creation, and rightly famous I think, but not my cup of tea. By half way through I was rooting for the Harkonnens. I can only take so much humourless solemnity rendered in lacklustre prose.

    Now, probably on to some more fiction. Something from: Gene Wolfe, Cervantes, Dostoevsky's Demons, Huysmans' Against Nature, Calvino's Invisible Cities, short stories by Gogol and Lem.

    I've been reading some stories by Donald Barthelme: "The Balloon", "The School", and "On the Deck". Great stuff. I'd never read anything like them before.
  • 180 Proof
    6.5k
    Now, probably on to some more fiction. Something from: Gene Wolfe, Cervantes, Dostoevsky's Demons, Huysmans' Against Nature, Calvino's Invisible Cities, short stories by Gogol and Lem.jamalrob
    :cool: :up:
  • Snakes Alive
    729
    Reviews of previous books:

    Austin's Sense and Sensibilia
    Really incredible. No idea why I hadn't read it sooner. Section VII should be mandatory reading for everyone. Sadly some of the finer-grained judgments he uses to attack Ayer strike me as either mistaken (in that I actually agree with Ayer's linguistic judgment) or too slippery to be used effectively as a methodology, and some of the ripostes struck me as ad hoc. It's a testament to how ineffective this kind of appeal to ordinary language tends to be that it breaks down precisely where interesting questions are asked, and the audience can't seriously sympathize with either party without just claiming to have one linguistic intuition over another. But, in the critique of foundational empiricism, really incredible.

    Hayakawa's Language in Thought and Action
    Seemed stupid, stopped reading near the beginning.

    Searle's Speech Acts
    As with all Searle, this is mostly boring, and not particularly insightful beyond a few clarifying points with regards to past authors (updating the Gricean notion of meaning in terms of the Austinian introduction of illocutionary acts, for example). Some of the postulates he appeals to, like that what is referred to must exist, that reference requires being able to uniquely identify an object to be successful, etc. just seem straightforwardly wrong, and I think treating predication and reference as 'speech acts' just muddies the Austinian terminology unnecessarily.

    Stevenson's Ethics and Language
    Seems promising so far, though maybe out of date by this point as a work of analytic philosophy. Only a short way into it.

    Austin's How to Do Things With Words
    Rereading this one. Still a masterpiece. I see new things every time I read it, and the insights seem to hold up better and better with time.

    Probably going to read Vendler's Linguistics in Philosophy and Derrida's Of Grammtology next. And maybe Barthes' book on semiotics.
  • Manuel
    1.9k
    The Morning Star - Karl Ove Knausgaard

    Re-reading:

    Manifest Reality: Kant's Idealism and his Realism by Lucy Allais
  • StreetlightX
    7.8k
    Stevenson's Ethics and LanguageSnakes Alive

    I've not read this, but one of my favorite texts on ethics of all time is the 3rd(?) section of Stanley Cavell's The Claim of Reason, where he brutalizes this book.

    And maybe Barthes' book on semiotics.Snakes Alive

    Am currently reading this one atm - schematic and functional, but good.

    Family Values: Between Neoliberalism and the New Social Conservatism by Melinda CooperMaw

    :cheer:

    Also, about to start:

    Michael Roberts - The Long Depression: How it Happened, Why it Happened, and What Happens Next. A defense of Marx's thesis on the 'tendency of the rate of profit to fall', in light of the post-2008 world economy.
  • Maw
    2.5k
    Michael Roberts - The Long Depression: How it Happened, Why it Happened, and What Happens Next. A defense of Marx's thesis on the 'tendency of the rate of profit to fall', in light of the post-2008 world economy.StreetlightX

    :gasp:
  • Snakes Alive
    729
    I've not read this, but one of my favorite texts on ethics of all time is the 3rd(?) section of Stanley Cavell's The Claim of Reason, where he brutalizes this book.StreetlightX

    Cool, I might check it out. Stevenson is mainly referenced today as an influence on a kind of non-cognitivism about moral language, so far as I know (which I don't think is plausible).
  • 180 Proof
    6.5k
    The Anomaly, Hervé Le Tellier
  • _db
    3.4k
    On Disobedience, Erich Fromm
    The Present Age, Søren Kierkegaard
  • Pantagruel
    1.9k
    Philosophy of Existence
    by Karl Jaspers
  • James Riley
    2.7k
    When Stars Came Down to Earth, Cosmology of the Skidi Pawnee Indians of North America, by Von Del Chamberlain.

    Second time through. Last time was about 20 year ago and I wasn't paying attention.
  • Maw
    2.5k
    Comments on the Society of the Spectacle by Guy Debord
  • _db
    3.4k
    The Civilization of the Middle Ages, Norman F. Cantor. An exceedingly pleasurable read, though not without its shortcomings.
  • Snakes Alive
    729
    In addition to the Derrida and Vendler, I've got the following on the list:

    Noam Chomsky – Cartesian Linguistics: A Chapter in the History of Rationalist Thought
    Benjamin Lee Whorf – Language, Thought, and Reality: Selected Writings of Benjamin Lee Whorf
    Wilhelm von Humboldt – On Language: On the Diversity of Human Language Construction and Its Influence on the Mental Development of the Human Species
    Abu Nasr al-Farabi – The Book of Letters
  • StreetlightX
    7.8k
    John Smith - Imperialism in the Twenty-First Century: Globalization, Super-Exploitation, and Capitalism’s Final Crisis
    Intan Suwandi - Value Chains: The New Economic Imperialism
  • Maw
    2.5k
    these sound interesting
  • StreetlightX
    7.8k
    Will let you know when I'm through!
  • Pantagruel
    1.9k
    The Origin and Goal of History
    by Karl Jaspers
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