Comments

  • The Essence Of Wittgenstein
    Do I have a choice?TheMadFool
    Well, you can quote Wittgenstein to support your argument.

    I don't think so. I'm attempting to go beyond the words, to the things themselves the word stands for.
    — TheMadFool
    But you do mention words in your OP.
    — Wheatley

    And...?
    TheMadFool
    Okay, it's not a rigid designator. My mistake.
  • The Essence Of Wittgenstein
    Words are signs, they stand for things. What they stand for is up to us, whatever we fancy that is. That's Wittgenstein.TheMadFool
    That's just an assertion.

    The essence of a thing is not the same as the essence of a word used to refer to that thing.TheMadFool
    I never suggested otherwise.

    I don't think so. I'm attempting to go beyond the words, to the things themselves the word stands for.TheMadFool
    But you do mention words in your OP.
  • The Essence Of Wittgenstein
    there's an, what I like to describe as, arbitrariness to words. There is no logical reason, no rationale, why "water" should refer to H2OH2O.TheMadFool
    I think what you are describing here is called a rigid designater, not an essence.
  • The Essence Of Wittgenstein
    words lack essencesTheMadFool
    Is it true that there is nothing that makes words words?
  • The Essence Of Wittgenstein
    true nature of a thing whatever that thing is.TheMadFool
    essence of waterTheMadFool
    is that which makes water water.TheMadFool
    :chin:
  • The Essence Of Wittgenstein
    words lack essencesTheMadFool
    I think we first need to be clear on what an essence is. We can start by tracing the philosophical idea of essence through history. Then a good strategy would be to start an inquiry why Wittgenstein rejected the idea of essences.
  • Can we live in doubt
    Philosophers have a habit of hijacking ordinary words such as "doubt", making them unnecessarily abstract just so they continue problematizing.
  • Can we live in doubt
    That's strange. One is cautious because one cares about oneself, about one's wellbeing. Related to that, cares about the wellbeing of those who are important to one.baker
    Okay, that's fine, have it your way.
  • Can we live in doubt
    The only reason to be cautious in the first place is because you are in doubt, or at least when you are judging a dishonest person. Hence being cautious is related to doubt.
  • Can we live in doubt

    I rather not go around doubting everything. Just a personal preference. :up:
  • Who needs a soul when you can have a life?
    Why do you ask, if you are not responding to replies?
    I sent you my reply more than a week ago ...
    (https://thephilosophyforum.com/discussion/comment/605997)
    Alkis Piskas
    I lost interest in my thread, sorry. :pray:
  • Can we live in doubt
    That's a horrible way to live! :death:

    Doubt is not a pleasant emotion. :grimace:
  • Can we live in doubt
    That's not doubt, that's caution.baker
    In my mind they are closely related.
  • Can we live in doubt
    doubt becomes a fetishBanno
    That's the first time I have ever heard that. :brow:
  • Can we live in doubt
    While doubt (and certainty) are inherent aspects of our lives, turning doubt into a fetish is a sure way to set yourself up for manipulation. Science deniers see themselves as bastions of rational discourse, doubting the authority of the men in white coats.Banno
    Thats just examples of nasty people misusing doubt in ways of looking out for their own interests. It is well known that the Russian goverment manufacured doubt to encourage distrust in respected institutions. My advice is to ignore such idiots and continue doubting as you normally would.

    The middle path, doubting here and being certain there, is the only viable approach. The issue it, what is here and which is there.Banno
    No middle path.
  • Can we live in doubt
    We can all live with doubt. The more you doubt the less susceptible you are being manipulated and be taken advantage of. Scam artists and many types of fraudsters prey on gullible peoole who never learned to doubt. Skepticism (which is a form doubt) is essential for doing science.

    I more curious about folks who manage their adult lives believing whatever authority figures say without hestitation.
  • The Shoutbox
    It's sad to think a pig will never grow up to be baconHanover
    It's heartbreaking to see pigs being used for pets when so many poor families go without ham.
  • The Shoutbox
    My heart goes out to pigs in need of transplant. :cry:
  • What does hard determinism entail for ethics ?
    When libertarian free will was a widely held belief unexamined by philosophy and Plato convinced much of philosophers that you ought to do what is right by definition, moral philosophers searched to know what is right while rarely examining metaethical questions.

    However, when the Enlightenment brought hard determinism into the spotlight, the question of whether or not hard determinism entails that ethics is irrelevant became increasingly important, and the fact that free will is presupposed by our justice systems only made the question more important.

    Some, such as David Hume, have settled on a soft determinism to avoid the question, while others have answered by proposing that the non-existence of responsibility entails the non-existence of right and wrong.

    My view is that hard determinism does not make ethics irrelevant, because right and wrong are also about justification, more specifically, justification of an action, that is, ethics is also about whether an action is justified or not, and free will is irrelevant to justification, therefore we can continue asking moral questions.

    Anyway, what do you think ?
    Hello Human
    My view is that in order for criminal justice to exist (as we know it) we must assume a certain level of autonomy and responsibility of individuals, called "free will". It doesn't matter that your actions from the moment you were born, to what you are going to eat for dinner are determined by the laws of nature. As long as you are a citizen who is participating in a society, it is inevitable that you will be judged by your actions which are guided by your own free will to make choices of your own volition.
  • Can we live in doubt
    Richard Feynman Quotes
    “I think it's much more interesting to live not knowing than to have answers which might be wrong. ... I don't have to know an answer.”
  • Logic is evil. Change my mind!
    I strongly reccomend watching the video in the link to understand this betterFalseIdentity
    He doesn't say anything definitely. :yawn:
  • How do we know that our choices make sense?
    Whenever we decide to do something we believe that what we are about to do actually does make sense. How do we determine if we are right or wrong? How can we be certain that our actions are actually beneficial and not counterproductive? In other words is there a way to know in advance that we are making a mistake? Can we predict the results of our decisions in order to avoid unintended catastrophic consequences?Average
    This is a pristine example of overthinking. :sparkle:
  • Suicide is wrong, no matter the circumstances
    Suppose the US government sends a spy to investigate a terrorist group in Afghanistan. The spy does his job collecting documents and eavesdropping on conversations. Suddenly (and unfortunately) the spy accidentally blows his cover. Quickly thinking, he comes to the conclusion that upon capture, the terrorists will torture him severely. Keeping in mind the horrendous suffering he's about to experience, he chooses to put a bullet in his own brain.

    I believe that the spy was justified in ending his life. OP destroyed. :fire:
  • Alternatives to taxation when addressing inequality
    Great! Let's put Microsoft out of business.
  • Suicide is wrong, no matter the circumstances
    "Life's a Bitch and Then You Die"; and then God sends your ass to hell because suicide is wrong.
  • Alternatives to taxation when addressing inequality
    The kind that mints boatloads of money. The world's richest people provide the best hints and tips.TheMadFool
    Hmmm... I bet The US pentagon knows how to create exceptional software (they need to because of all the cyber threats). What's stopping them from selling sofware to ordinary citizens and businesses?
  • Alternatives to taxation when addressing inequality
    Do business, like everyone else. Duh! :grin:TheMadFool

    What kind of business do you think governments can reliably undertake?
  • Alternatives to taxation when addressing inequality
    I shall call it a "democratic corptocracy!" :party:
  • Alternatives to taxation when addressing inequality
    Maybe bringing back government bonds, and government begging, would help to fund its projects without all the theft and forced labor.NOS4A2
    I do not know about forced labor, but doing away with taxation and relying on bonds is a horrible idea, and will leave the government massively underfunded. President George W. Bush even had this strategy of "starving the beast" which basically meant that we can achieve smaller government by cutting taxes. Long story short, it didn't work. The US government, underfunded by tax cuts sustained its overblown government budget by acquiring a load of debt. The only thing George W. Bush did was starve younger generations with an increased debt burden.