• FrankGSterleJr
    22
    A common refrain unfortunately prevails, especially among Western capitalist nation governments and big business circles—that best business practices, including what's best for the consumers, are best decided by business decision makers.

    Other than what's best for bottom-line corporate profit margins, this was proven false by, as a most consequential example, Boeing’s decision to keep its ill-fated 737 Max planes flying, regardless of indicators, including employee warnings, they should be grounded and serious software glitches corrected.

    While an ousted CEO received more than $62 million to leave Boeing—likely from what’s now described as a “culture of concealment”—346 ticket-buyers received a most horrific death.

    Furthermore, I've yet to read in the mainstream news-media how when the COVID-19 crisis began, the most influential, and maybe even the first, voices to have the ear of governments likely were the largest corporations, particularly the airlines.

    The result was resistance against an immediate halt in international commerce, including overseas flights, weeks of delay that may have translated into many COVID-19 deaths.
  • Outlander
    776
    Other than what's best for bottom-line corporate profit margins, this was proven false by, as a most consequential example, Boeing’s decision to keep its ill-fated 737 Max planes flying, regardless of indicators, including employee warnings, they should be grounded and serious software glitches corrected.FrankGSterleJr

    That. Or is just goes to show myopic oversights and quick, no-holds-barred, bum-rushed gains don't always constitute "what's best for bottom-line corporate profit". Especially in the long run. Someone up the chain of command might have gotten lazy, greedy, complacent, or a little of all three. That's what happens when the person knows no matter what happens his golden parachute will open.
  • FrankGSterleJr
    22
    As a "culture of concealment"—and I feel the fact that that phrase was boldly used should give some additional emphasis to Boeing’s disgrace—I doubt it was a case of one or a few bad apples.

    Its frightening influence over FAA decision-makers, who essentially acted as a rubber stamp for the giant corporation’s flawed 737 Max product (and who knows what else), gives credence to the truism “power corrupts; absolute power corrupts absolutely”.
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