• Marchesk
    3.9k
    Shivers in my mind
    I am searching for your qualia
    Everything shivers
    In gray matter
  • bongo fury
    692
    (not saying they do now...)Olivier5

    Heaven forbid.
  • Harry Hindu
    3.6k
    No, "the subjective experience of thinking" is a poetical description of the thoughts, I say.bongo fury
    And the observation of brain shivers is the same thing - a poetical description of another's thoughts.
  • Harry Hindu
    3.6k
    I propose "shivering qualia". This is a harder problem, because one cannot just quine the shivering away. Actually, I kind of like the term "shivering" now.Marchesk
    "Shivering" is itself a particular type of qualia. "Shivering" is a term that only an entity with visual experiences could use in the appropriate way.
  • bongo fury
    692
    And the observation of brain shivers is the same thing - a poetical description of another's thoughts.Harry Hindu

    Not necessarily.

    "Shivering" is a term that only an entity with visual experiences could use in the appropriate way.Harry Hindu

    Surely, anyone with sufficient flair for metaphor who had experienced shivering, e.g. with cold, could apply the term appropriately to sound events just as well as to illumination events?
  • Harry Hindu
    3.6k
    Not necessarilybongo fury
    What else could it be? Where does the observation of shivering brains reside? In what form does the knowledge that brains shiver take if not a visual of a shivering brain?

    Surely, anyone with sufficient flair for metaphor who had experienced shivering, e.g. with cold, could apply the term appropriately to sound events just as well as to illumination events?bongo fury
    Using metaphors is part what it means to be poetic.
    Does my brain shiver when its cold, or is it my body that shivers?
  • Mijin
    78
    Black is the qualia that first made me realize that color is not "out there".
    But some people still don't quite get it, so you might find a better example is certain composite colors like magenta. There is no single wavelength of EM radiation that will make a human see magenta; the right cone activation only happens from two different wavelengths hitting that patch of the retina. But, we know those photons don't actually "mix", or interact with each other. So how can magenta be "out there"?
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