• christian2017
    1.2k
    @aletheist

    Can a galaxy that is traveling through space at some point in time occupy the same space that another galaxy (there are many galaxies) used to occupy? I'm not saying i know the answer to this but i was wondering what your answer was?
    — christian2017
    Since we invent points and instants as needed for any particular purpose, it depends on how we define them. If we set up a three-dimensional coordinate system for space only, then I suppose that the answer is yes--different things can occupy the same point at different instants. If we set up a four-dimensional coordinate system for spacetime (block universe), then I suppose that the answer is no--only one thing can occupy any individual point-instant.

    I ask again: What exactly do you mean by "absolute points in space"?
    — aletheist

    Ok great! I agree with that.
    christian2017

    Just in case you forgot.
  • aletheist
    1.3k
    I didn't come up with the term absolute points in space so i'm not going to give an exact definition.christian2017
    If you do not know what the term "absolute point" means, then why do you keep using it? Why do you keep imposing it on me? In ordinary English, absolute is the opposite of relative; and again, coordinates are relative, not absolute. That is all I am trying to clarify.

    Absolute points in space is the spot on my desk where my pencil is resting can in the future be occupied by another object and also possibly be the approximate center of another galaxy far far away at some point in the future.christian2017
    The spot on your desk is not an absolute point. It is always in motion due to the rotation of the earth about its axis, the revolution of the earth around the sun, the revolution of the entire solar system around the center of the Milky Way, and the movement of the entire galaxy through space. Motion is the reality, points and instants are our artificial creations.
  • christian2017
    1.2k
    I didn't come up with the term absolute points in space so i'm not going to give an exact definition.
    — christian2017
    If you do not know what the term "absolute point" means, then why do you keep using it? Why do you keep imposing it on me? In ordinary English, absolute is the opposite of relative; and again, coordinates are relative, not absolute. That is all I am trying to clarify.
    aletheist

    ok.
  • christian2017
    1.2k
    Absolute points in space is the spot on my desk where my pencil is resting can in the future be occupied by another object and also possibly be the approximate center of another galaxy far far away at some point in the future.
    — christian2017
    The spot on your desk is not an absolute point. It is always in motion due to the rotation of the earth about its axis, the revolution of the earth around the sun, the revolution of the entire solar system around the center of the Milky Way, and the movement of the entire galaxy through space. Motion is the reality, points and instants are our artificial creations.
    aletheist

    I agree with that. Perhaps there was a misunderstanding in all these many posts, stretched out over this forum. Considering i agree with your answer to the two galaxy example, i don't see any point in going through the many posts and trying beat this dead horse even further. Actually your answer to the two galaxy example was one of my main questions on the OP.
  • fishfry
    1.4k
    a ruler bought at walmart is a certain size.christian2017

    Not if the ruler is moving very fast relative to the speed of light. This was actually known before Einstein. It's the Lorentz contraction.
  • christian2017
    1.2k
    a ruler bought at walmart is a certain size.
    — christian2017

    Not if the ruler is moving very fast relative to the speed of light. This was actually known before Einstein. It's the Lorentz contraction.
    fishfry

    i agree.
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