• frank
    1.5k
    When we discussed Pattern and Being, it was available online. Truth and Rule Following (which further develops the same ideas) only has been published as the last chapter of Having Thought: Essays in the Metaphysics of Mind, HUP, 2000. I can't legally post pdf documents but I can PM you a treasure map.Pierre-Normand

    Awesome! Thank you!
  • Pierre-Normand
    1.4k
    I thought you'd be interested on Terence Tao's thoughts on the development of mathematical skill.fdrake

    Thanks very much for that. I think this idea, suitably adapted, might dovetail nicely with Wiggins's account of someone's conception of a concept, construed as the Fregean sense of this concept (while the concept itself still lives at the level of Bedeutung, or of Fregean reference). Tao's idea of the development in skill/understanding lines up with Wiggins's idea of the improvement of a conception that enables, at once, a better grasp of the sense of a concept and an active participation into its constitutive practice.

    Wiggins develops this idea most fully in The Sense and Reference of Predicates: A Running Repair to Frege's Doctrine and a Plea for the Copula

    Just like the pragmatized (embodied and situated) neo-Kantian account of Sellars, Haugeland and Bitbol, Wiggins's account of the way in which we grasp concepts steers a middle path between anchoring them into merely contingent features of the embodied subject or making them fully 'independent' of us (in the manner of modern Platonism). The precise account of this cognitive anchoring, though, appeals to some features of modality and reference that are indebted to Frege and to Kripke (and Putnam). Those features have been highlighted by Gareth Evans, also, in The Varieties of Reference (in the chapter on proper names, which discusses reference to natural kinds, also). I've written some posts about this many years ago on a Yahoo discussion group. I'll try to locate them.(*)

    (*) Here they are: see mainly this post, which was a followup on this one.
  • aletheist
    820

    I continue to find your argumentation nonsensical, and have decided to stop wasting my time with it. Cheers.
  • Pierre-Normand
    1.4k

    :up:
    Wayfarer
    (In response to this post by @apokrisis)

    Seconded!
  • fdrake
    1.4k


    I sometimes get the feeling that analytic philosophers hide that they're talking about anything interesting by talking about language. So my eyes often glaze over when they shouldn't. I will read your notes on them, though.
  • Pierre-Normand
    1.4k
    I sometimes get the feeling that analytic philosophers hide that they're talking about anything interesting by talking about language.fdrake

    I sometimes get this feeling too, but have seldom gotten it while reading either Kripke, Putnam, Evans or Wiggins. They are quite adept at navigating between the formal and the material modes of speech, as Carnap might have put it. Pondering over how things can sensibly be said to be (philosophy of language), and how things can sensibly be thought to be (metaphysics and philosophy of thought), often are one and the same inquiry.
  • fdrake
    1.4k


    Since you've already primed me to think of this in terms of the creation of the synthetic a priori and how that creation interfaces conceptually with the world, it's interesting. Maybe my new mantra reading on similar topics should be: 'they're talking about how we interface with the world through language'. Your prose in the first note isn't making my eyes glaze, though, so thank you for that.
  • Pierre-Normand
    1.4k
    Maybe my new mantra reading on similar topics should be: 'they're talking about how we interface with the world through language'.fdrake

    Yes, and when they fail to do so, then, maybe, they're just passing off linguistics as philosophy of language, or they are falling prey to psychologism in the sense Husserl and Frege warned against. (Not that there is anything wrong with pure linguistics or scientific psychology, per se, but it's not philosophy.)

    Just for reference, Michael Luntley's Contemporary Philosophy of Thought: Truth, World, Content, Blackwell, 1999, is a very good introduction to the philosophy of language qua philosophy of thought.
  • fdrake
    1.4k


    It will be added to the list. Thank you for the reference.
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