• Rich
    3.2k
    The whole body experiences anxiety. The modern infatuation with the brain (as an idol of some sort) would be comical if it wasn't so harmful - as all idols eventually become. One can equally ask the ridiculous question whether one can experience anxiety without a heart, or a spine, or a liver?

    The body is in every way and manner a complete, holistic, living embodiment of the Mind. Anxiety can spring as much from a poor diet as from rigid thinking. There is no magic bullet. To moderate it one must investigate oneself, one's habits, one's perspective on life.
  • CasKev
    407
    Don't worry, depression is all in your head. I'm sure anxiety is too...

    Click here for idiotic rant
  • Rich
    3.2k
    Don't worry, depression is all in your head. I'm sure anxiety is too...CasKev

    Too bad some good ideas are lost in the chaotic presentation. Still, she presents magic bullets and there are none. Everyone is different as are the approaches. In my experience, there is always a habit that had to be changed whatever it might be. In her case, she is working to hard for Likes and it shows.
  • praxis
    881
    The body is in every way and manner a complete, holistic, living embodiment of the Mind. Anxiety can spring as much from a poor diet as from rigid thinking.Rich

    Well, no, not really. A poor diet can result in excess energy or high arousal, such as from refined sugar or too much caffeine, but it takes a mind and it's concepts and past experiences or conditioning to turn the internal perception of high arousal into fear or panic.

    It takes a human mind and its concepts to fear things like death, or imaginary things like ghosts or whatever. We can even learn to fear fear, or rather fear our interoceptions of high arousal in particular conditions.
  • Rich
    3.2k
    Ultimately it's all Mind, but the type of food one eats is as much of an intake as the things we see, the smells we smell, the tastes we tastes, the nourishment we different.

    If you want to know what sugar can do to entire emotions, just observe children who are in a Big Mac diet.
  • charleton
    1.2k
    The anxiety is unreal.Posty McPostface

    SO is pain. It's all in the head - what's your point.
    People still get anxious when all those needs are met.
  • praxis
    881


    I can tell what effect sugar has on emotions by consuming it myself. The affect sugar induces is nevertheless just internal sensation which doesn't necessarily trigger fear or panic.

    I've had panic disorder when I was younger and I would be the first to agree that the first thing anyone should do to overcome the condition, or just to generally get hold of their emotions, is to focus on diet and exercise. After all, the purpose of emotions is to regulate energy.
  • Rich
    3.2k
    The affect sugar induces is nevertheless just internal sensation which doesn't necessarily trigger fear or panic.praxis

    It affects emotions. Everyone is different.
  • Metaphysician Undercover
    4.7k
    The whole body experiences anxiety.Rich

    I think anxiety is a heart based condition rather than brain based.
  • TimeLine
    2.7k
    As in emotionally or the actual heart?
  • Agustino
    11.3k
    No. that's not what I said. I said that anxiety gets directed toward particular beliefs, so the anxious person can, with conscious effort, direct the anxiety toward various activities, aiming for a balanced life.Metaphysician Undercover
    No, that would be a life controlled by anxiety masquerading as a balanced life.

    It is very clear, that we cannot deduce, in a necessary way, the existence of any particular belief from the observance of any particular actionMetaphysician Undercover
    Sure, not in an absolutely necessary way.

    nor can we demonstrate that any particular belief will necessitate any particular action.Metaphysician Undercover
    If you grant a specific context too, then we could, in some cases, demonstrate that a particular belief will lead to a particular action.

    And, since "belief" is commonly defined as an opinion, or acceptance of an idea, I think that your claim that we can have beliefs which we are not aware of, is contradictory.Metaphysician Undercover
    It's not contradictory at all. We don't consciously know everything that we believe. That's why we have things like unconscious drives, or why in CBT the therapist tries to get the patient to become aware of deeply held beliefs that he's not aware of on a conscious and linguistic level. Someone, for example, may have internalised that he is inferior to others, and so, every time he sees someone laughing, say at a party, they assume that they must be laughing about them, and then they will start feeling bad, unwanted, etc. etc. So the therapist has to show the patient that he actually believes, on a feeling level, that he is inferior. Bringing this belief into consciousness allows the patient to dispute it, or to practice cognitive distancing for that matter. This is standard CBT practice, I really don't understand why you're not familiar with it.
  • Agustino
    11.3k
    Right, that is my experience with anxiety. it always comes on as a general feeling, over my entire body, especially in the chest area, almost like an extreme form of anticipation, as if my whole body is prepared to act, but with no particular act being imminent.Metaphysician Undercover
    That's not anxiety, that sounds more like a panic attack. Not the same thing.

    I may experience it day after day, but if I manage to maintain a high level of activity, directing my mind toward this and that, as important objects, and things already determined as needing to be done, this is effective in expending the energy build up, subduing the anxiety and the urge to think about what needs to be done. If I allow the anxiety to well up, I may be overcome by irrational thoughts and beliefs.Metaphysician Undercover
    Exactly - so your way to "keep it in check" is actually to give free reign to the anxiety to structure your life. You got to keep yourself busy, or else... That's a terrible situation to be in imo, since you lose control, and your anxiety controls you instead. It keeps you continuously on the move, giving no respite.
  • Metaphysician Undercover
    4.7k

    Isn't there a reason why emotions are said to be "of the heart"? I wouldn't say that anxiety is an emotion, but it's likely more closely related to emotions than to thoughts. Emotions have great influence over the thoughts. The reason I said anxiety seems to be of the heart, is because of the way it feels, like it is centred in the chest, and radiates outward through one's whole body.
  • Metaphysician Undercover
    4.7k
    It's not contradictory at all. We don't consciously know everything that we believe. That's why we have things like unconscious drives, or why in CBT the therapist tries to get the patient to become aware of deeply held beliefs that he's not aware of on a conscious and linguistic level.Agustino

    You can assert this all you want, but it would take a lot more than that to convince me that unconscious drives are beliefs. I think that's a simple misuse of the word "belief".

    Someone, for example, may have internalised that he is inferior to others, and so, every time he sees someone laughing, say at a party, they assume that they must be laughing about them, and then they will start feeling bad, unwanted, etc. etc.Agustino

    Again, I think that to characterize an inferiority complex as a belief is to misuse the word "belief".

    So the therapist has to show the patient that he actually believes, on a feeling level, that he is inferior. Bringing this belief into consciousness allows the patient to dispute it, or to practice cognitive distancing for that matter. This is standard CBT practice, I really don't understand why you're not familiar with it.Agustino

    This is not a case of bringing the belief into consciousness, it is a case of the therapist diagnosing the patient, such that the patient now believes that the symptoms are caused by an inferiority complex. This is no different from when I go to my doctor with symptoms, and the doctor diagnoses me as having the flu. When the doctor tells me this, I then have the belief that I have the flu. It is not the case that the doctor is bringing my already existing belief that I have the flu, from my unconscious into my consciousness.

    That's not anxiety, that sounds more like a panic attack. Not the same thing.Agustino

    Yes Doctor. But isn't a panic attack a case of anxiety in your medical textbook?

    No, that would be a life controlled by anxiety masquerading as a balanced life.Agustino

    ..

    Exactly - so your way to "keep it in check" is actually to give free reign to the anxiety to structure your life. You got to keep yourself busy, or else... That's a terrible situation to be in imo, since you lose control, and your anxiety controls you instead. It keeps you continuously on the move, giving no respite.[/quote]

    Ha, ha. I'll take this as a joke. All you're saying is that I'm in a terrible situation because if I loose control of myself I'll be in a terrible situation. Doesn't this apply to anyone? You loose control of yourself and you're in a terrible situation.

    Edit: It's good to be active.
  • praxis
    881
    I think anxiety is a heart based condition rather than brain based.Metaphysician Undercover

    That would seem to depend on the kind of anxiety you're referring to. A prey animal may get anxious after catching the scent of a predator, but it's not going to imagine getting attacked and eaten or its children becoming orphans or any other mental simulations that may heighten its anxiety. Ruminations that bring anxiety don't require any external stimuli.

    In the sense that heart sensations and rate are part of the interoceptive network emotions could be seen as heart based.
  • charleton
    1.2k
    I think anxiety is a heart based condition rather than brain based.Metaphysician Undercover

    All emotions are primarily generated by the brain.
  • Rich
    3.2k


    This may will be the case. Ancient cultures pretty much all agree that the Heart is the seat of Life being that the beat of the heart provides the impetus of life. Here is one instance where science is catching up to what had been pretty well established for thousands of years:

    https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/gut-second-brain

    "scientists were shocked to learn that about 90 percent of the fibers in the primary visceral nerve, the vagus, carry information from the gut to the brain and not the other way around. "Some of that info is decidedly unpleasant," Gershon says.

    The second brain informs our state of mind in other more obscure ways, as well. "A big part of our emotions are probably influenced by the nerves in our gut," Mayer says."
  • Metaphysician Undercover
    4.7k
    All emotions are primarily generated by the brain.charleton

    I agree that there is much brain activity associated with emotions. But emotions are feelings, and feelings involve many aspects of the nervous system as well as the associated organs. So I think that you hold an overly simplistic opinion to say that emotions are generated by the brain.

    That would seem to depend on the kind of anxiety you're referring to. A prey animal may get anxious after catching the scent of a predator, but it's not going to imagine getting attacked and eaten or its children becoming orphans or any other mental simulations that may heighten its anxiety.praxis

    I think it is a simple case of reversing the symptoms with the illness, to say that anxious thoughts cause anxiety rather than to say that anxiety causes anxious thoughts.

    Ruminations that bring anxiety don't require any external stimuli.praxis

    Are you suggesting a brain in a vacuum scenario? Are you saying that a brain in a spacious vacuum would be anxious? Anxious about what? Where did the rest of the world go?
  • praxis
    881


    Maybe that was poorly phrased. I should have said that thoughts can lead to anxiety without any external stressors. Conversely, high arousal and unpleasant affect could induce anxiety and anxious thoughts.

    My understanding is that emotion, including the anxious variety, is basically comprised of interoception (nerves connected to internal organs), our conditioning, emotion concepts, and thoughts, and of course whatever is going on in the world around us.
  • TimeLine
    2.7k
    Isn't there a reason why emotions are said to be "of the heart"? I wouldn't say that anxiety is an emotion, but it's likely more closely related to emotions than to thoughts. Emotions have great influence over the thoughts. The reason I said anxiety seems to be of the heart, is because of the way it feels, like it is centred in the chest, and radiates outward through one's whole body.Metaphysician Undercover

    While there is an intimate relationship, what is questionable is whether anxiety disorders contribute to heart disease or the other way around. PTSD symptoms, for instance, where there is a persistence of anxious thoughts, poor and irregular sleep, poor eating etc could be the factors that cause heart problems and so anxiety contributes to the overall health of your heart, but it is not the heart itself that causes anxiety. It is no different to other risk factors including smoking, eating foods in saturated fats and not exercising etc., and I assume that regular episodic experiences of anxiety can elevate blood pressure. The risks either way are multifaceted as there is no doubt that bad health can lead to somatic sequelae just as much as psychological vulnerability can cause bad health.

    It is centered in the chest and radiates outwards likely because of blood pressure; anxiety, I believe, is caused psychologically and it effects the body that likewise prolong the anxiety because of bad health such as sleeplessness and a poor diet.
  • ArguingWAristotleTiff
    3.2k
    @TimeLine
    {{{TimeLine}}} <<virtual hugs
    Everything is going to be alright, I promise you. Even if it doesn't seem that way right now or didn't seem right back then, it became a part of who you are as you present your character today and that is a pretty cool lady. Everything will work out exactly as it is supposed to and you are exactly where you are supposed to be at this very moment in life. You are free to enjoy the aroma of fresh growing roses that have been misted in the setting sun, only being surpassed by the heavy scent of Gardenia flowers satiny in the dusk, as the Night blooming Jasmine begins to wake to greet the moon. Look up to the stars for grounding here on earth. For wherever you travel, wherever you sleep at night, you can look up to the Heavens and as sure as the sun sets, the stars stand stoic watching over you against the deepest of blue skies. Sleep well dear one and enjoy the sweetest of dreams, knowing that I will stand vigil until the first rays of sun beg you to rise again.
  • Agustino
    11.3k
    Full-blown panic attack is marked by very high blood pressure (although that is normal - there is nothing wrong with it, unless you're in panic-attack mode 24/7 - it also occurs during strenuous aerobic exercise). When I had panic attack, I took BP, and it was 210/110 :-O

    Severe anxiety is marked by, what is known as isolated systolic hypertension - meaning, you have something like 150/75, with a widening of normal pulse pressure. Long-term (and long term it really means over 10-20 year period), this will have negative consequences.

    I have had high blood pressure on and off since I was 15 or so, and never took any medication for it (still don't). I'm somewhat borderline 140/90 or slightly below. Doctors are reluctant to give medication in such cases, especially for young people. And mine doesn't seem to be related to diet, though it is positively affected by aerobic exercise (running) when I keep up with it in the summer (winter's just too cold to run).

    Blood creatinine, cholesterol, tryglicerides, etc. are all okay for me. No excessive salt intake. But that blood pressure just doesn't want to decrease!!! >:O Maybe stress has something to do with it, I'm usually a very stressed kind of person :> lol

    In fact, let me take it right now...

    What did I tell you... 138/88...
  • Wallows
    6.2k


    You can easily purchase guanfacine or clonidine online if it becomes an issue. Or even propanolol.
  • Agustino
    11.3k
    You can easily purchase guanfacine or clonidine online if it becomes an issue. Or even propanolol.Posty McPostface
    I've tried that propranolol once before, and it slowed my pulse to about 50-55, gave me ectopic beats, made me urinate a lot, and made me feel dizzy upon getting up from a chair, and other sudden movements, so I discontinued it.
  • Agustino
    11.3k
    You can assert this all you want, but it would take a lot more than that to convince me that unconscious drives are beliefs. I think that's a simple misuse of the word "belief".Metaphysician Undercover
    So if I tell you I believe the key is on the wardrobe, but then I go and search for it under the cupboard, wouldn't you conclude that I probably lied about what I believe, and my actions indicate better than my words what I truly believe?

    Belief cannot be divorced from action.

    Again, I think that to characterize an inferiority complex as a belief is to misuse the word "belief".Metaphysician Undercover
    An inferiority complex is a belief. Unless we are to go by your silly notions that an inferiority complex is some mysterious thing that causes beliefs that one is inferior *shakes head* :-}

    This is not a case of bringing the belief into consciousness, it is a case of the therapist diagnosing the patient, such that the patient now believes that the symptoms are caused by an inferiority complex.Metaphysician Undercover
    *facepalm* - no, an inferiority complex does not cause the belief, it IS the belief. This is a clear case of reification of the worst kind on your part. There is no other entity or thing that you can call inferiority complex. If you remove that belief, then whatsoever we called the inferiority complex before would also have been removed.

    Otherwise, I will ask you to tell me what is this inferiority complex? An inferiority complex does not function the way a virus functions, when we say that your cold is caused by the flu, etc. It's a false analogy when we're talking about the mind.

    When the doctor tells me this, I then have the belief that I have the flu. It is not the case that the doctor is bringing my already existing belief that I have the flu, from my unconscious into my consciousness.Metaphysician Undercover
    ...

    Yes Doctor. But isn't a panic attack a case of anxiety in your medical textbook?Metaphysician Undercover
    No, panic attack isn't the same thing as anxiety. One can be anxious without having a panic attack. And people who are generally not anxious at all may have, all of a sudden, a panic attack. But prolongued anxiety may lead to panic attacks or make them more likely.

    Ha, ha. I'll take this as a joke. All you're saying is that I'm in a terrible situation because if I loose control of myself I'll be in a terrible situation. Doesn't this apply to anyone? You loose control of yourself and you're in a terrible situation.Metaphysician Undercover
    Nope, that's not what I said. I said that if you have to keep active in order not to be anxious, something is wrong inside your mind, and you ought to address whatever that issue is so that you don't have to keep yourself active for the sake of combatting anxiety.

    Edit: It's good to be active.Metaphysician Undercover
    :-} - no, I don't see how it's good to be active for the sake of being active. It's good to be active if you've got problems to solve and things to do. But if you have neither problems, nor things to do, then you ought to just be relaxed and do nothing. If in that state, you get anxious, there's something wrong with you, since it's a psychological reaction aimed at preventing you from becoming aware of something. That's why when you have nothing to do you get anxious - to prevent your mind from thinking or becoming aware of certain things.
  • Metaphysician Undercover
    4.7k
    While there is an intimate relationship, what is questionable is whether anxiety disorders contribute to heart disease or the other way around. PTSD symptoms, for instance, where there is a persistence of anxious thoughts, poor and irregular sleep, poor eating etc could be the factors that cause heart problems and so anxiety contributes to the overall health of your heart, but it is not the heart itself that causes anxiety.TimeLine

    You describe anxiety in a person who is in an abnormal state, a condition of illness, PTSD. I think that you would agree with me that anxiety within a person, to a certain extent, is normal. What I suggest, is that we look at anxiety in its normal state, to get a true understanding of what it is, because the abnormal state is a complex, and therefore complicated situation, rendering examination or analysis of individual components nearly impossible.

    I have been an anxious person all my life, for as long as I can remember. This is not to say that I have been diagnosed with any anxiety disorder, but that I have been consciously aware of my anxiety for a long time, such that I could look back at my young childhood in a way that I could see how anxiety influenced my psychological response to many different events. Do you agree that to be anxious is to anticipate and to anticipate is to expect? So anxiety exists as a relationship which one has with the future. There are two distinct classes of things anticipated, the good and the bad. We might be able to say that anxiety related to these two types of events is normal anxiety because it is reasonable to be anxious in relation to an impending good thing and to an impending bad thing. But then there is anxiety when there appears to be no such impending good or bad event, and this anxiety is unreasonable. Let's just say that an event is anticipated but it cannot be distinguished as a good event or a bad event, because it is completely unknown.

    Now let's take this unreasonable anxiety and see if we can expose it. It cannot be created by thoughts in the brain, because there are no beliefs about any impending events, good or bad. If an impending event was apprehended by the brain, then a judgement could be made concerning this event. But no such impending event is apprehended, and that's why the anxiety remains unreasonable. This is how I would classify unreasonable anxiety, anxiety which is not supported by the brain's judgement of something impending. It cannot be the brain which is creating this anxiety because the anxiety is completely unreasonable to the brain, and the brain's response to that anxiety is one of confusion.

    When I had a major car accident, this feeling was ongoing for months after and it was a long while later that realised it was PTSD from the accident. Just prior to the accident, I was being harassed with indirect threats and it re-surfaced some childhood memories to add to the anxious confusion and I was always physically shaking.TimeLine

    Now consider what you've said here. Your anxious condition preceded your car accident. The accident intervened as a significant event which would alter your psychological condition Therefore you ought not attribute your post-accident condition directly to your anxiety, as the post-accident condition may have come about due to the accident, and the anxiety preceded the accident.

    What I have found, by examining my childhood experiences with anxiety, is that I was very prone to high anxiety when I anticipated something good. The anticipation of something bad caused significantly less anxiety. The anticipation of something good created a looking-forward, an expectation, which caused the anxiety to build as the time of that good thing approached. Then, when the event occurred, there was a release from that anxiety. The release consistently manifested in some form of disappointment, a "let down", because the event itself could never match the expectation of it, or so the posterior "down state" seems to suggest. Depending on the magnitude of failure in the actual perception of the anticipated event, the disappointment could be significant, with effects that were much more significant and lasting than the actual anxiety prior to the event. Thus my strongest "bad feelings" were associated with the failure of some anticipated event. The bad feelings could progress in any direction, leading to anticipation and anxiety concerning more impending bad things, or perhaps even the completely irrational production of anxiety in relation to no impending event. The condition of anxiety being the preferred condition over the disappointed condition.

    So I am suggesting that you differentiate anxiety, which is by its very nature something which is an anticipation of something significant, whether or not the significant thing ever occurs, from the mental conditions which follow from anxiety. In a complex situation these feelings will get all tangled up in a complicated and confused manner, such that a person may not be able to distinguish one from the other.

    ... but it is not the heart itself that causes anxiety.TimeLine

    I would ask you then, what causes anxiety. Let's put anxiety in its most raw, naked condition, and see if we can determine what it is. I think it's just a feeling that something is going to happen. As I explained above, it cannot be produced by the brain's thinking that any particular event is about to happen. Can we say that the passing of time is like a force upon us? The future is always impending, and the things which are coming must always be dealt with. Anxiety is how our bodies are disposed toward this fact that the future is impending.

    So if I tell you I believe the key is on the wardrobe, but then I go and search for it under the cupboard, wouldn't you conclude that I probably lied about what I believe, and my actions indicate better than my words what I truly believe?

    Belief cannot be divorced from action.
    Agustino

    This is not relevant. You have not disclosed any unconscious belief, only the fact that you can consciously hide your belief from me by being deceptive.

    An inferiority complex is a belief.Agustino

    WIKIPEDIA: "An inferiority complex is the lack of self-worth, a doubt and uncertainty about oneself, and feelings of not measuring up to standards."

    According to Agustino, doubt and uncertainty are belief. You are scaling a wall of contradiction. Be prepared to fall when the reality that there is nothing but contradiction supporting that wall hits you.

    *facepalm* - no, an inferiority complex does not cause the belief, it IS the belief.Agustino

    Right, doubt and uncertainty "IS the belief". Wall of contradiction falls on your head.

    No, panic attack isn't the same thing as anxiety. One can be anxious without having a panic attack. And people who are generally not anxious at all may have, all of a sudden, a panic attack. But prolongued anxiety may lead to panic attacks or make them more likely.Agustino

    Of course one can be anxious without having a panic attack, but a panic attack is a condition of anxiety. You said: "That's not anxiety, that sounds more like a panic attack". Here's an example of your ridiculousness. Suppose having a "fever" is defined as a particular level of high body temperature, say above 38 degrees. This allows that one can have a high body temperature without having a fever, but fever is still a case of having a high body temperature. Then I refer to someone with a body temperature of 40 as someone with a high body temperature. You object and say "that's not a high body temperature, that's a fever". See how ridiculous your argument is?

    I said that if you have to keep active in order not to be anxious, something is wrong inside your mind, and you ought to address whatever that issue is so that you don't have to keep yourself active for the sake of combatting anxiety.Agustino

    This is clearly false because the anxiety is not directed toward any specific object of thought, so it is not my mind which is creating the anxiety. I would call it a state of hyperawareness, similar to what some might call hypervigilance. It is a condition attributable to my entire body, and therefore not something "wrong" inside my mind. Have you ever consumed caffeine and felt the effects of this drug? Would you characterize the condition produced by caffeine as something wrong inside your mind?

    Your an odd sort, if you think that the need to stay active indicates that "something is wrong inside your mind".

    no, I don't see how it's good to be active for the sake of being active.Agustino

    What I've described is the need to stay active for the sake of being healthy. Again, I say that your an odd sort if you think that the need to stay active for the sake of being healthy is indicative of something wrong inside one's mind.
  • Agustino
    11.3k
    Of course one can be anxious without having a panic attack, but a panic attack is a condition of anxiety. You said: "That's not anxiety, that sounds more like a panic attack". Here's an example of your ridiculousness. Suppose having a "fever" is defined as a particular level of high body temperature, say above 38 degrees. This allows that one can have a high body temperature without having a fever, but fever is still a case of having a high body temperature. Then I refer to someone with a body temperature of 40 as someone with a high body temperature. You object and say "that's not a high body temperature, that's a fever". See how ridiculous your argument is?Metaphysician Undercover
    Anxiety is a different medical condition than panic attacks. Why is that? Are the doctors idiots?
  • Agustino
    11.3k
    Have you ever consumed caffeine and felt the effects of this drug?Metaphysician Undercover
    I don't drink coffee no... except when I drank 12 espressos in one day >:O

    I didn't feel effects to be honest apart from not being able to sleep, and fast heart rate - but it wasn't troubling since it also gave me a lot of energy.

    I would call it a state of hyperawareness, similar to what some might call hypervigilance. It is a condition attributable to my entire body, and therefore not something "wrong" inside my mind.Metaphysician Undercover
    So if this is so, why do the hyperaware Buddhist monks, or Christian contemplatives not experience anxiety while meditating, but rather a profound sense of joy and inner peace? These people work to cultivate and heighten awareness, so I'm not at all convinced that anxiety is hyperawareness.

    Nor would I say that the sort of "high" you get from caffeine is hyperawareness OR anxiety for that matter, but rather maybe focus and energy.

    Your an odd sort, if you think that the need to stay active indicates that "something is wrong inside your mind".Metaphysician Undercover
    Well, if your "monkey mind" to use a Buddhist expression, forces you to stay active, cause otherwise you experience anxiety, then I think there is something wrong with it. One should be able to be inactive, without experiencing anxiety - that is called relaxation, and it's important.

    What I've described is the need to stay active for the sake of being healthy.Metaphysician Undercover
    Only if you equate "not being anxious" with "being healthy". And your little subterfuge doesn't actually do anything, except attempt to escape what I've been saying. Namely, if it is possible to be inactive at times without being anxious, that is what "being healthy" would qualify as, not distracting yourself (being active) so that you avoid experiencing anxiety.

    Being active in a physical sense (exercise) is good - in moderation. That reminds me that I haven't gone to the gym for a long time in this new year :/

    This is not relevant. You have not disclosed any unconscious belief, only the fact that you can consciously hide your belief from me by being deceptive.Metaphysician Undercover
    So through my actions, I'm not disclosing my belief? You can't infer, from the way I act, what I believe about the location of the keys?

    WIKIPEDIA: "An inferiority complex is the lack of self-worth, a doubt and uncertainty about oneself, and feelings of not measuring up to standards."

    According to Agustino, doubt and uncertainty are belief. You are scaling a wall of contradiction. Be prepared to fall when the reality that there is nothing but contradiction supporting that wall hits you.
    Metaphysician Undercover
    Right. So does one who experiences an inferiority complex not have the belief that they fail to measure up to whatever standard is under question? Or at the very least the belief that they MAY very likely fail to measure up to it?

    Right, doubt and uncertainty "IS the belief". Wall of contradiction falls on your head.Metaphysician Undercover
    Doubt and uncertainty are founded upon a series of beliefs. Beliefs are foundations for doubt and uncertainty.
  • Buxtebuddha
    1.8k
    Every panic attack is a moment of anxiety, but not every moment of anxiety is a panic attack. If you've never felt the difference between a panic attack and less acute anxiety, you probably won't understand why "idiot doctors" have made such a dichotomy.
  • Agustino
    11.3k
    Why are you telling me? It's MU who doesn't understand that. I perfectly understand that panic attacks and anxiety are related, but they are different conditions, and I agree with the distinction drawn by doctors.
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