• Jeremiah
    425
    I think someone needs to learn how to read.
  • Bitter Crank
    4.1k
    It's a long ways back, but agriculture was a major innovation, if not a discrete invention. Presumably it began inadvertently: proto-agriculturists started collecting seeds -- barley grains, maybe, and planted some of them. They apparently discovered that the biggest seeds produced more big seeds. The people who created the 15th century tomato that the Spanish brought back to Europe started with a very small fruit, more like champaign grape (1/4" in diameter). The maize/corn plant was a very short plant, bearing just a few seeds. Most of our crops started out as rather unimpressive progenitors.

    The domestication of cattle, donkeys, pigs, sheep, goats, and horses was likewise very important. For the most part, these animals are all herd animals, and relatively calm in their wild state The American buffalo, on the other hand, is a quick-to-respond aggressive herd animal.

    Every improvement on a sharp stick moving towards a proper plow was important inventive work. Figuring out how to use animal power was important -- from pulling things to carrying us on their backs. Learning how to ferment food (cheese, bread, beer, wine, sausage, etc.) was a big innovation.

    Agriculture may have been a very early "invention", but you know, it took us a long time to get there after we became homo sapiens.
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