Comments

  • The Shoutbox
    *The Eye of Providence is looking*
  • I'm really rich, what should I do?
    Yeah, and I'm Frank Sinatra. This is amusing but please stop taking the piss, Shawn.Baden

    I would show you my bank account if I could; but, that's like going to a public bathroom to show your dick in front of the pisuar, completely pointless and distasteful.
  • I'm really rich, what should I do?
    All I'll say then, off the top, is that I would

    (1) subsidize TPF with no-strings attached grants (the details tbd with site owners/admins, et al)

    (2) provide grants (re enough to live on for a year or two at a time) to TPF members who are writing books of original scholarship-research in philosophy science history art biography or fiction ... with an eye towards, at the very least, self-publishing (selection criteria details, again, tbd)

    which I admit reflects my own concerns and aspirations. Anyway, that's the least of what I'd do, Shawn; good luck with whatever you decide. :death: :flower:
    180 Proof

    I'm actually considering reaching out to Paul to refloat the old PF, and see how that goes, and finance it. I had some ideas of paying the moderators and seeing what they can do with providing resources like SEP and posting their thoughts new topics. I really missed Postmodern Beatnick, and would be looking around for mod's that have phil degrees and offer some financial assistance to support their work and promote it their. I also think, I would look forward to inviting actual philosophers more for anything ranging from AMA to posting about their philosophic writings. I also would like to have a chess corner built into the forum software if @Paul could organize that.

    I might reach out to you about (2) in the future. That's all about that I've got in mind.
  • I'm really rich, what should I do?
    Of course, there's a big difference between having just enough to live comfortably, and having a great surplus. But that's kind of the key to me. Life is just a series of habits. As we live, so we think. For me, my thoughts are to have a nice home gym, to establish healthy patterns of eating and exercise, to read and write a little more, to donate a bit more to and also volunteer a bit with some local charitable organizations, like the food bank. Maybe we will buy ourselves a nice, new electric vehicle (I'm thinking of a Hyundai Kona).

    If I had a whole lot of money, and allowed my life to become about buying a lot of things, well that would become one of my dominant and defining habits. I'm not sure how that advances the set of cognitive habits that constitutes me. It doesn't really make me anything more than a consumer, a hyper-consumer. That's not something I aspire to be.

    What do you aspire to be?
    Pantagruel

    Thanks for the input and reply to my question. I suppose we can only speak for ourselves, and what you would so seems like a little modification in your life.

    AI aspire to go to somewhere like USC in California for possibly a masters in behavioral economics. That seems like a natural extension of my abilities that I could hone in on. I want more education in my life. One of my old wants in regards to education is to finish a degree in philosophy, especially analytic philosophy.

    There ain't much I want to do with my money other than park it somewhere. I think that offering it all to XYZ isn't as rational as growing it and doing what Warren Buffett wants to do with his wealth upon his death.

    Regardless, I want to finish my masters first, and then see what avenues that opens for me and my wealth.
  • Aristotle and his influence on society.
    In the ancient world there was considerably more social stratification, and the hoi polloi were held in low regard. (I wonder if you see echoes of that in Heidegger's conception of 'das man'? Is that the element in Heidegger that is said to be proto-fascist?)Wayfarer

    I'm not sure. You may want to ask @Ciceronianus, he would know. :smile:
  • Aristotle and his influence on society.
    I don't know if Aristotle really argues that the virtuous man should be treated differently, like some kind of master.Xtrix

    I believe that is something he advocates openly in the Ethics. It's been a while since I've read Aristotle and I'm quoting from Russell's - History of Western Philosophy.
  • The Shoutbox
    Why has Plato influenced so many people so fundamentally; but, yet, his greatest aspiration was never applied in practice of there arising a philosopher king?
  • Aristotle and his influence on society.
    I don't think there's enough emphasis on Aristotle in modern curricula, although it's a subject that has to be taught with an eye to the historical and interpretive matters. And of course for a section of the populace, Aristotelianism will be forever associated with the Catholic Church and condemned on that basis.Wayfarer

    Not only the Catholic Church; but also think about how his conception of man was so influential towards Randians. Why is that?
  • Aristotle and his influence on society.
    Look first to the society they lived in. Greece was not egalitarian. Privileged men played leading roles at the top of the heap with not too many in the middle, and a lot at the broad base. Not only did they practice slavery, but anyone unfortunate to be bankrupted or captured in battle could become a slave.Bitter Crank

    Yes, well. Plato wrote about Spartan society mainly, which the Greeks looked in very high regard.

    However, Aristotle wrote about a way of personifying ethics through virtue, which was equivalent to happiness, and a end desirable inofitself. What speaks strangely to me is how people looked at his characterization of men and turned it into something profane by modern egalitarian like-minded people. Why is that?
  • Aristotle and his influence on society.
    I endeavor not to blame authors for the misuses (or abuses) of their works by politicians and theologians, unless said authors in their own rights are dogmatic ideologues.180 Proof

    How true that this happened so much towards Plato when assimilating his views of the soul into Christianity! And, sadly, the philosopher king was never attempted or taken seriously.

    Aristotle's dogmas, I think, don't align with the subsequent political or theological dogmas rationalized in his name.180 Proof

    Yet, why was it so appealing to men to take parts of his Nicomachean Ethics and use it to justify forms or what many women call chauvinism on parts of males?
  • Aristotle and his influence on society.
    Could you re-phrase this question? I think I'm understanding you but I want to be sure.Xtrix

    In the summary of the Nicomachean Ethics that I'm reading from Bertrand Russell's perspective it's said that Aristotle maintained a view in accordance of the magnanimous man standing in higher regard than other men for being virtuous, as defined by Aristotle. The question to rephrase, would be that why does it seem so important that someone who is in higher standing with regards to ethics, should be treated any differently.

    Maybe, I'll just base this off my proclivities of egalitarianism, which Aristotle isn't very accommodating towards with his conception of what most modern day women might call male 'jingoism'.
  • Steve Keen, Economics, the environment and thermodynamics.
    That's rather the issue in question, isn't it?Banno

    I don't think it can be persuasively argued on until there are other motivations other than profits, value, or expenses. Markets adhere by a common agreement in law and jurisprudence of a country. So, I don't think the system can take care of itself, as traditionally understood.

    Is the market taking care of itself a conclusion, or an assumption?Banno

    It's an assumption of laissez-faire economics, which has been time and time again been refuted by market failures, and poor accounting on behalf of rational actors operating in the cosm of "the greater world", and not only individual nations.
  • The Shoutbox
    So, what kind of pig pix do you want?Bitter Crank

    Mostly those British naturalist one's like, which I will get:

    pigsoatsoriginal.jpg?auto=compress%2Cformat&fit=scale&h=700&ixlib=php-3.3.0&w=1361&wpsize=fp_1600_700
  • Steve Keen, Economics, the environment and thermodynamics.
    Apples and oranges?

    The only metric governing the behavior of the above are productivity and efficiency increases. Thus, the market takes care of itself, and has no overriding natural law such as thermodynamics governing a differential in entropy. Even then, demand can still mandate a larger increase in supply due to expectations, so that would violate thermodynamics of the economy.

    I mean, it's also hard to argue that we can take into account the recently hotly debated externality of climate change into our equations. For example, try and define a common unit of cost of each ton of carbon emissions emitted into the atmosphere that would (under ideal circumstances) be agreed on by most rational actors. You can do that if you're all under the same banner as the EU does; but, how can the EU convince China that their cost of per ton of carbon emissions is equal to theirs? (This issue of agreement can only proceed from legal agreement or consensus on an issue, and hence is not in the scope of economic analysis to direct or confront the issue, and by definition this would be a tragedy of the commons issue).


    Classical economics breaches the first and second laws of thermodynamics by treating the economy as a closed system that increases in order.Banno

    You might not be familiar with the economic saying "et ceteris paribus", all other things held equal. Again, you can't just assume that every externality is taken under consideration.
  • The Shoutbox
    I'm looking forward to buying a pig painting soon. Any pics? This is my favorite at the moment:

    fcd35c25-c746-4b42-998d-f571eeeeedd1_570.Jpeg
  • The Shoutbox
    Did Hanover finally get a pig?
  • The Shoutbox


    That would be nice. How are you doing in general my fellow philosopher?
  • Blood and Games
    Thinking of our own times, sports (though much less bloody and risky relatively speaking than the games) are sometimes thought to instill virtue or involve a sort of artistry. You know, the "playing fields of Eton" sort of virtue, at least. Do they? If our sports do, and the Roman games did not, why is that the case?Ciceronianus

    Given that the height of gladiatorial fights manifest in modern day boxing, I believe that incidents like what Mike Tyson did to his opponents ear-lobe-no longer occurring-makes us modern "men", so much less, "masculine".

    Obviously, men have aggrievances over this fact. To whom, nobody really knows.
  • The Shoutbox


    This is too distressing.

    *Pig squeals and runs away.*
  • What are you listening to right now?
    @Noble Dust, what's The Weekend all about?

  • IQ Myths, Tropes and insights
    I'm curious to hear what people think are the actual and meaningful limitations of the metric, and what benefits or value (personal or social) it provides.Reformed Nihilist

    I think, that there are two types of IQ tests. One where g is measured due to knowledge and memory abilities (non-culture fair tests) and the other where g isn't as heavily measured as in Ravens matrices tests and culturally fair IQ tests.

    In the latter case I believe that academic success, associated with IQ testing isn't as heavily measured; but, the culturally fair tests that I have taken indicate greater fluid intelligence, which didn't do anything meaningful for academic achievement in my opinion. There's a caveat to culturally-fair testing in my opinion, where you can learn to do better on the test, and hence we have a tendency to measure g more heavily on tests like Binet or others.

    I scored high on tests that don't measure g as heavily as on other tests. What the implications of that mean is that you can carry on a conversation pretty well for intellectual stimulation, as a form of pragmatic utility derived from such a high number.
  • The Shoutbox
    *Pig looks around and starts wallowing*
  • Is voting inherently altruistic?
    I would vote in favor of altruism, but I haven't seen it on the ballot. People vote in favor of their own interests (as they should) and they vote in favor of others' interests to the extent that they can relate to them.Bitter Crank

    What makes you say that voting should be based off of self-interest? Much of the issues separate from the certain death and taxes, require a semblance of altruism to function for the benefit of other people. I mean, social issues are raised by propositions in my state of California. However, if one disregards the importance of altruism in voting, do we end up with more polarization between voting parties?

    Otherwise altruistic people can organize in a flash if a non-profit wants to open a group home in their neighborhood for released offenders, recovering drug addicts, sex offenders, or former mafioso. No, no, no! We need to protect women and children from these menaces! Keep the sons of bitches in prison!Bitter Crank

    So, what gives? Is this about dominating interests or political forces coercing people to vote in a certain way?
  • Is voting inherently altruistic?
    At the core of democracy is the notion that we are in this together and together we can build a common wealth.Banno

    Apparently someone might call this socialism. Isn't it? Anyway, I have no issues with altruism when facing problems or issues to solve. There are things that are of higher value to me than the profit-motive, and unfortunately the myth that voting is virtue signaling at its core, is true, but during the 50's virtue signaling through voting was never so cool to do.

    The myth of 'enlightened self-interest' is a curse that undermines that common wealth. It is the root of the ongoing failure of your democracy.Banno

    More precisely, the notion of enlightened self-interest originated in the past with the arrival of the marketplace. One does dealings with X irrespective of X's heritage or biases towards X, and both parties end up happy as long as the deal can be ratified legally through legal tender issues by and from a common government. Anyway, what's so wrong with enlightened self-interest in your opinion?
  • Is voting inherently altruistic?
    As an example of altruism with a concrete self-interested benefit, one need look no further than at unemployment benefits. The small minded will cavil and object, "Why should I pay for him (or her)?"tim wood

    Ah, yes. The non-existent fairytale of welfare kings and queens living off your dime or 0.0001 cents.
  • What has 'intrinsic value'?
    If you mean value is always wrt to some standard, then sure. But is that really the case? I invite you to think a bit more about what value is. Is gold valuable? How do you go about answering that question? Or if not gold, then food, water, shelter, or tickets to the opera.

    Your question would seem to be, can there be value where there is no valuer? A nonsense question until and unless the details qualified, but qualification then being/providing the answer.
    tim wood

    I take it as following. A good-in-of-itself is recognized as valuable to a person or even government. The issue with determining value or ascribing value to something that has worth is complex because it has utility, as far as I can tell.

    When you rule out utility and preference, you are still left with subjective an aesthetic appreciation of value, as you describe it being tickets to the opera or some such?
  • What has 'intrinsic value'?
    I'd say community has intrinsic value.john27

    It's somewhat vague to say that community has intrinsic value. Comparative to what else?
  • What has 'intrinsic value'?
    What's the problem with intrinsic value being reduced to instrumental value?khaled

    Mainly a definitional one. Things that have intrinsic value are good in-of-itself. Something with instrumental value is regarded as something that has relative value depending on needs or wants. Hence the issue with the definitions not coinciding...
  • I'm really rich, what should I do?
    I can only tell you what I would do if I had that money. But you've got to figure that out yourself. What is it that you care about? Do you care about humanity or not? What is a good life?Xtrix

    I'm concerned about trying to provide a means for educational games for young people that aren't that resource intensive on processing power of a computer. I used to play some games like that, that made school, where I couldn't pay attention no matter how hard I tried, an easy venture. It's very hard for me to explain just how difficult school would have been if I didn't play those educational games that provided the core concepts distilled and entertaining to learn whilst interactive.

    There's somewhat a lot of interest in online games that are fun to play, and quite a lot of interesting educational games for people to utilize. I haven't seen anything engaging for young children to play anything that would tell them how to multiply large numbers in an easier manner than doing it on your hands. I also want some advanced concepts better explained or educated rather than listening to some Hindu on YouTube that is trying to make spare change, like the Khan Academy.

    One of my other ideas is to invest into online video production for entertainment. It wouldn't make much money; but, in my opinion the quality of in-game graphics has improved so considerably that you can make some photo-realistic scenes even in something like Unreal Engine 4/5. See for yourself:


    So, yeah, education and entertainment.
  • The Shoutbox
    Seems like I was wrong again. Macaroni and Cheese from Kraft has been around from 1937.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=how+old+is+macaroni+%26+cheese
  • The Shoutbox


    Imagine what would happen if they disclosed Macaroni & Cheese back then? There's be strikes and lynching all over the neighborhoods.
  • Currently Reading
    Reading an old one and no longer taken seriously.

    The Price of Inequality by Joseph Stiglitz

    Sadly, none of which really gathered too much in effect in policies or mandates against reckless market behavior.
  • Do people desire to be consistent?
    I have a personal narrative. It didn't come from my desire of consistency though, its rather more just a series of twists to satisfy my conflict of interest.john27

    I have a pretty weak narrative in my head. I don't really have a strong causal narrative in my head for the matter. I think it differs for each person on how they perceive issues in their life. Hitler called it Mein Kampf, and Buddha called it the Noble Eightfold Path.
  • Do people desire to be consistent?
    I believe all people have a narrative in their head shaped and governed by how they internalize issues and thoughts. That 'narrative' is governed by some semblance of consistency in my opinion, no?
  • I'm really rich, what should I do?
    Start a non-profit community/education center that focuses on helping folks with some aspect of development you think is worth it. You could probably afford quite a few of these.

    Fund scholarships/grants.

    Travel the world like Leon Logothetis and enhance peoples lives who demnonstrate unusual kindness.

    Give money away to charity.

    Fund the short story contest prize for $10,000

    Hire me.
    Nils Loc

    Of all the things, I'd rather hire you. I'm very vigilant about what I should do with my money now that I finally have some.

    Let me know what you'd like to do in PM or even here.
  • I'm really rich, what should I do?
    I think that's a good idea. The max IRA contribution is $6,000 per year, so you should be able to funnel your tens of billions of dollars into your tax free investments in a couple of billion of years. Well, maybe less because it increases to $7,000 I think at age 50.Hanover

    Ah yes, I believe it is something I can not do. I totally forgot all the formalities with all the buzz around what's happening recently. Sorry.

    But anyway, congrats on your big payday!! Was it your year end bonus?Hanover

    I'm not a CEO. I just sold some ideas.
  • I'm really rich, what should I do?
    Are you trying to say you’re a billionaire? Or is this just to make a point?Xtrix

    Yes, I am a billionaire. I don't want to come off as stuck up or anything; but, that's what I was able to do. I don't even want 'money' to change me.
  • I'm really rich, what should I do?
    Alternative 2 - Call your therapist and ask him to increase the dosage on your mood stabilizers.T Clark

    You're an engineer so, I'll disclose the generalities of the ideas of the patents sold for your benefit or amusement:

    I made my money with a novel way to provide cheap and effective air conditioning consisting of utilizing sound waves or in an even more advanced version ultra-sound to decrease Brownian motion inside a chamber where the sound or ultra-sound waves decrease the volume of the coolant (PV=nRT) and with that expends the ambient temperature of the coolant. It's really much simpler than kinematic cooling through compression of the coolant.

    I don't think making up these stories would make any sense. I really sold these ideas and made a profit.