• Shawn
    10.3k
    First, sorry to the mods about starting so many threads; but, this question hasn't been asked enough.

    It has taken me too much time to arrive at this question. I feel so stupid that it has taken me so long to finally ask the right question.

    So, given that most of us on this forum have the basic of necessities in life accounted for, why ask or demand from life, more? I mean, one has to appreciate the fact that they're even asking this question, am I correct?

    A poster on this forum once stated, that the best we Westerners can do is simply state that we have enough and more is not needed. Yet, in some sick and sadistic manner we perpetuate our grief of excess by asking for more.

    I've grown up in an affluent family, and have things simply handed down to me. It strikes me as strange, that one never would ask this question in life, and continue or perpetuate a never ending cycle.

    So, reader, what is it that makes us ask for more? I would really like an answer different than the rote, 'ego is the obstacle', as this makes this some kind of relativism in culture, with Eastern teachings in some ways superior to our own. I don't really buy into the idea that the ego is the main problem here. It simply realizes wants and wishes.

    So, reader, how do you explain the need, no... want! for more?
  • Xtrix
    528
    So, reader, how do you explain the need, no... want! for more?Shawn

    I don't think this is a well-formulated question.

    What do you mean by "explain"? Explain what, exactly? Desire? Wanting itself? Willing?

    I take what you mean as explaining greed. In which case, there's been plenty written about that. There's been plenty written about "selfishness," etc.

    The obvious answer, to me, is simply that these aspects are part of our being, our "nature" (in the loose sense of the term). But that could be wrong -- maybe some people don't have it at all. We are also very generous, we love others, we're kind, value friendship and cooperation, etc.

    But for us -- the people of the modern world -- I think it's largely conditioned by the predominant philosophy, beliefs, and values of our culture.
  • Shawn
    10.3k
    What do you mean by "explain"? Explain what, exactly? Desire? Wanting itself? Willing?Xtrix

    Yes, wanting, what makes people want more?
  • Xtrix
    528


    I have to say that it appears to me to be a given -- the constant sense of moving towards something -- the future, an object, a location, a feeling, a sensation, a thought. In this activity, we're evaluating as well, meaning we label the phenomena "pleasant" or "unpleasant", "good" and "bad." We approach some aspects and avoid or "flee" others. It's always appeared to me to be the same as "willing," although this may be more associated with the act of planning and goal-creation. In Schopenhauer this is the "will to live," in Nietzsche it's "will to power." In Buddhist philosophy, it's "desiring" in the sense of "craving."
  • Shawn
    10.3k
    It's always appeared to me to be the same as "willing," although this may be more associated with the act of planning and goal-creation. In Schopenhauer this is the "will to live," in Nietzsche it's "will to power." In Buddhist philosophy, it's "desiring" in the sense of "craving."Xtrix

    It's a stipulative term to say that someone wants something, is it not? I am somewhat confused about the need for more, when it is apparent that it's a want.
  • Xtrix
    528


    I didn't understand this.
  • Shawn
    10.3k


    Think about it this way... If my desire for more is confused with a need, then isn't that some form of trapping oneself in a manner of speech?

    Or even differently, is the presupposition of "Why do I want more?" indicative of already having met needs?
  • Xtrix
    528
    Think about it this way... If my desire for more is confused with a need, then isn't that some form of trapping oneself in a manner of speech?Shawn

    "Trapped" in the sense that the "needing" and "wanting" never end? I suppose so.
  • Shawn
    10.3k


    But, one can always realize that they have their needs met by asking such questions as, 'What more do I want?' Yes?
  • Xtrix
    528


    Wanting only temporarily ceases depending on the want. Other wants come up to guide our actions. If we're hungry, we seek food. Once we're full, we're off to something else -- the need for entertainment, maybe, or sex, or drugs, or writing on the computer. It goes on and on. There is no real way out of it except in death. You can tweak it all a bit, but that's all you can do.

    I still don't think this question really makes sense, nor have you clarified it in any meaningful way. Better to talk about what wanting IS rather than why we want "more." There's always going to be something more we want. Who cares.
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