• Robert Lockhart
    155
    Could the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing plausibly act to encourage a recapitulation of human technological progress to date - maybe even leading to our erstwhile view of the practically unlimited future potential of such progress being placed in a new and more realistic perspective?
    Like, I’m thinking for example of how the euphoria regarding the potential for future human space exploration following the Apollo 11 mission – almost Dan Dare whizzing between the planets and all that - has since been superseded by a more sober recognition of the extreme limits which are in fact imposed on the potential for such activity by theoretical physics - rather than merely engineering knowledge (ex. The impossibility of negating the humanly intolerable degree of ‘G’ force that inescapably would be imposed on an astronaut during the process of acceleration towards the percentage of light-speed requisite for inter-stellar travel, etc.)

    So, to cut short - given the fact that all future tech-progress must increasingly become susceptible to the old law of ‘Diminishing Returns’, maybe – did Armstrong allude to the idea on the lunar surface - maybe the ultimate result of the ‘Space-Age’ could be to bring us all back down to Earth? :)
  • Robert Lockhart
    155
    Wrote while pissed...
  • TheMadFool
    3.8k
    You must not give up on human ingenuity. I find the iron maiden torture device especially inspiring. If we could do that to another human being, surely we can do anything.

    Seriously, I think science has certainly turned on the lights in some rooms but there are still many many unexplored rooms in the grand mansion that is our universe. Perhaps we can find something interesting there...a warp drive? mind uploading? Maybe...just maybe...
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