• Wallows
    9k
    What failed with your growing venture, if you don't mind me asking? My best friend/roommate and his friends set up a substantial grow-op in our rental house basement all year and it was quite successful, a good 19-25 plants/clones and some good weed came of it. At one point every cubbord in our hallway was filled with plants HAHA.Grre

    Well, initially I wanted to grow indoors. Cannabis (indica) likes that high altitude climate where it originated from Afghanistan and Iran if I'm not mistaken. Sativas (green crack, kinda bad name; but it's awesome) are my favorite, despite them being harder to grow and have lesser yields than indicas. Indicas are just heavy hitters and have the best yields. Anyway, long story short, I couldn't grow indoors like I wanted to with Ceramic Metal Halide lamps, which are twice as efficient as the normal HPS lamps.

    So, I grew outdoors; but, my dad at the time and mom were pretty much against the whole venture and told me to stop growing it. The laws are strange in California, counties ultimately decide if growing cannabis outdoors is OK or not. I live in Ventura County where everyone has a stick up their ass. Los Angeles is much more liberal.

    I intend to grow inside my home some 16 plants to supplement our income to pay off the mortgage and stuff. I'm still working on convincing my mom about the whole thing. There's also the issue of high electricity costs in my part of the world. I wanted to save enough to put a solar array on my roof.

    Best regards.
  • TheMadFool
    4k
    Laughed a bit when I read that the James only understood Hegel when high, the first time I watched a documentary on Hegel I was pretty baked myself. But it didn't help with comprehension. Not sure WTF Hegel was on back in the day-but I could sure use some of it (joke).

    Not sure about break throughs-perhaps we'll never know how much of philosophy, let alone art or science, are thanks to break throughs made while high. Its worthy to note that many of the best writers in the world/history are known alcoholics or ex-drug addicts...interesting correlation between substance abuse and long-term abstract conceptional thinking...I think that the majority of artists/philosophers experimented with drugs and alcohol because substance using attracts a certain kind of person, just like philosophy attracts a certain kind of person, thus the two overlap (ie. introspective tendencies, curiosity, mental illnesses/life issues/need to escape). This is a big mistake that people make when talking about marijuana 'causing' mental illness-it doesn't, marijuana attracts a kind of person already pre-disposed to or suffering the mental illnesses-in many ways, that's why people often seek out drugs, due to uncomfortable circumstances. I stopped smoking weed for more than a year-and i admit, it was one of my most productive self-improvement years of my life, but that's not because I stopped smoking weed, but because my life circumstances more generally, got better.
    Grre

    Perhaps there's some truth in drugs augmenting the mental faculty. I knew somebody who claimed it helped him be creative in problem solving and he was well-known as a very intelligent person - "tactical" would be the correct word here.
  • Pattern-chaser
    1.8k
    I knew somebody who claimed it helped him be creative in problem solving and he was well-known as a very intelligent personTheMadFool

    This is also my belief and experience. :up:
  • Christoffer
    543
    Please be careful about theorising what people with neurological conditions might experience - unless you have Parkinson's yourself? I have MS, and your 'explanation' seems garbled to me. How much do you know about the human CNS, and how it actually works?Pattern-chaser

    I'm not theorizing in any scientific matter, how can you make that interpretation? I was speculating based on what I've read about cannabis research for Parkinson's and the observations I've made both on others and myself. It's speculation, a hypothesis, not a theory. And having CNS problems does not equal being an expert or telling others that they cannot think or speculate about such things. It's like saying people can't talk about cancer if they don't have it themselves. I would much rather break down the hypothetical ideas I had, in order to find out if they aren't valid because of... if they are incomplete because of... or if they are valid because of... If you have knowledge on this subject that counter-argues or help expand the ideas presented that would be much more welcomed.
  • Pattern-chaser
    1.8k
    having CNS problems does not equal being an expert or telling others that they cannot think or speculate about such thingsChristoffer

    Indeed. And not having CNS problems probably equates to being even less of an expert, don't you think? But I wouldn't dream of telling anyone "they cannot think or speculate about such things". Speculate all you like, as far as I'm concerned. :up:

    Having said that, I'm here to tell you that the effects of CNS problems are often difficult to describe, or even to imagine, if you don't have such problems. I experience sensations for which there are no words. I.e. no words have been coined to describe these things, partly because so few of us (sufferers) need them, and partly because the effect of a partly-functioning/partly-damaged nerve gives rise to feelings that are ... indescribable. The explanation is easy. Living with it is less so. And, for most CNS conditions, there is no cure, which is a little depressing.
  • Christoffer
    543
    And not having CNS problems probably equates to being even less of an expert, don't you think?Pattern-chaser

    A person without MS can still be more of an expert, otherwise, you wouldn't have experts in the medical field researching it. In my case, however, I wouldn't dare to question your knowledge in MS since having it would equal you knowing more both through experience but also the knowledge gained around it. :up:

    Having said that, I'm here to tell you that the effects of CNS problems are often difficult to describe, or even to imagine, if you don't have such problems. I experience sensations for which there are no words. I.e. no words have been coined to describe these things, partly because so few of us (sufferers) need them, and partly because the effect of a partly-functioning/partly-damaged nerve gives rise to feelings that are ... indescribable. The explanation is easy. Living with it is less so. And, for most CNS conditions, there is no cure, which is a little depressing.Pattern-chaser

    And I wouldn't try to explain or argue about such experiences. What I referred to here specifically was an observation by my own CNS reaction to THC. And after having read about the cannabis research on Parkinson patients, I tried to induce why such improvements occur based on the observation of "lag" in intention and movement that I experienced. As you mentioned, it's hard to put into words those experiences you have subjectively within a framework of a hypothesis. I can only say that the CNS reaction to THC was very interesting and worth taking notice of. As long as I don't present anything as a theory of any scientific truth-claim I think it's worth mentioning this experience as I think even without having any problems myself I am, as well as everyone, interested in reaching progress with finding cures and solutions to things like this.
  • thedeadidea
    98
    marijuana is interesting in a few ways if nothing else the historicity and arguments for it being banned is an interesting ethical/historical/political point.

    There are some health benefits associated with marijuana but from what I understand most of it has to do with anxiety, cancer pain as well as well being, spontaneity and so on... Obviously, there are some who take it to say listen to music or socialize as well, which I think is a benefit.

    But long term I think it isn't that healthy and even impairs cognitive function.

    To be fair though this would depend on dosages and how one chooses to smoke it, vaping as opposed to a water pipe or bong is a sharp contrast.
  • Pattern-chaser
    1.8k
    But long term I think it isn't that healthy and even impairs cognitive function.thedeadidea

    But if you have MS, as I do...?
  • thedeadidea
    98
    But if you have MS, as I do...?Pattern-chaser

    I will smoke with you and anyone that tells you that you shouldn't I will slap on your behalf
  • Wallows
    9k
    But if you have MS, as I do...?Pattern-chaser

    Sorry to hear @Pattern-chaser. My memory is somewhat fuzzy on the matter; but, I've heard pregnenolone helps with the myelin sheath damage also along with feelings of weakness. And, you have already read all about the benefits of THC in the condition, so I won't waste your time on that issue.

    EDIT: Lithium is pretty darn neuroprotective also. Look into it if you have some spare time.

    Cheers.
  • uncanni
    234
    I hope that we can start this discussion up again, because I'm fascinated from the inside. Cannabis has truly opened the doors of perception in ways that make my present experiences using it unlike any others at previous times in my life. I'm 66, I'm a scholar who loves to read and write and I grow my own Cannabis--an exercise that has changed my entire life.

    To cut to the chase: at this point in my life, I have excellent concentration and focus on scholarly activities when I vape Cannabis, or take it as tincture. It has completely changed the way I think and feel, producing a kind of elder revolution in my life which is most welcome and invigorating.

    I've done a lot of research on Cannabis in the areas of cultivation, ethnohistory, making concentrates and Cannabis as medicine and spirit plant (instead of animal). It deepens my insights every day; it's the best medicine I can imagine.
  • Grre
    137

    Hey there!

    I'm glad someone was interested in bumping this thread, as since my posts five months previously I've come across several relevant points,
    -There has been a direct link between big Pharma paying off well-known medical professionals to denounce marijuana as harmful or of no benefit
    -due to its history, much of the discrimination towards marijuana comes from entrenched racism and xenophobia, funny how drinking is an established "right" and cultural norm in much of Europe and North America, everyone drinks-its okay as long as you do it in moderation...yet marijuana, a drug from central Africa/Asia originally (or in some cases, like hallucinogenics in Indigenous cultures) has received historical persecution from eurocentric countries and cultures...hmmm

    There is also an interesting link between the act of growing marijuana (substance farming/horticulture) and the spiritual connection people feel for the drug and its effects. It's like a reverting to some form of primitivism, something that in our highly industrialized and urban lifestyles has otherwise been taken from us...I think this is another thing that threatens big pharma and perhaps, our entire industrial system, imagine the people being able to grow their own drugs! Not have to pay inflated insurance, be subject to marketing ect. ect.

    I'm also really glad to hear that cannabis has allowed you to better continue your research...I will always hold that mairjuana helped me in a time that I didn't have a lot of other options; at least not short term stop-gap solutions, I'm disappointed in modern philosophy for not taking more of a lead in drug use-especially philosophy of mind, but that is a symptom of a bigger flaw in academia in general I think
  • Pantagruel
    187
    As long as it's the right strain with some coffee it puts my focus through the roof, reading and writing.
  • Pantagruel
    187
    This article may be of interest, hippocampal neurogensis and memory:
    https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/eci.12920
  • uncanni
    234
    There is also an interesting link between the act of growing marijuana (substance farming/horticulture) and the spiritual connection people feel for the drug and its effects.Grre

    Hey Grre, I'm glad to know that there are others interested in this topic. I've been growing my own for a little over 3 years now, and that did indeed totally change my relationship to the the drug. I fell in love with the plants themselves, and I'm honored to be able to tend to them. Plus it's the best bud I ever had, considering how disrespectfully most folks treat their bud on the streets.

    I belong to a Cannabis-growing forum where numerous people have written about getting off opoids and other prescription drugs with the help of weed. This must send the big pharma demons screaming and tearing their hair out. There is just too much that is right about Cannabis for the economy and the environment, but I understand that this is extremely threatening to so many. One more sad comment about the state of our culture in the usa.

    When I was younger, I couldn't read when I was high, but I certainly can now; amazing how we grow into Cannabis--or how she envelops us...
  • uncanni
    234
    I like to think of the temporary loss of short term memory as a funny kind of blip, because I almost always am able to pick up the thread where it was before, provided I'm conversing with someone who's as focused on the topic as I am. What they don't mention in the research is how much deeper one can analyze. As for much of the lab testing of the effects of Cannabis, chances are that I'd be forgetful, paranoid and anxious if I were using the drug in such an environment.

    I will read the article!
  • Bitter Crank
    8.4k
    I haven't smoked cannabis, a lot, and I used to enjoy it. Somewhere along the line the way I reacted to it changed (or the pot I was smoking changed) and it stopped being amusing and became just a mild altered state that was kind of tedious. I bought some a few months ago in Colorado (edible and smokable) and have had the same reaction -- it was annoying more than amusing.

    Maybe it is the set and/or setting; maybe on other occasions I had had more beer; maybe I don't find my internal musings as amusing as I used to -- don't know. I definitely didn't find concentration, memory, insight, perception, or anything else changed for the better. 50 years have passed since the first effective use, so maybe the old gray horse isn't what he used to be. Very disappointing.

    On the other hand, I feel like my brain is working better now than it has for quite some time.
  • Grre
    137

    Fascinating article, I dont have a lot of history in biology/neuroscience, but I did get the gist, especially this part.
    nfortunately, scientists have looked only at one side of the coin due to the inability or refusal to see beyond the current models of thinking. A paradigm is a set of assumptions, concepts, values and practices that constitute ways of viewing reality for the community that shares them, especially in an intellectual discipline
    Seems once more that so-called "objective" science is not objective at all is it? Irritates me though, when cultural values-especially those based primarily on racism, withhold scientific progress that could improve people's quality of life. AD is a terrible disease.


    I watched my friend grow and tend cannabis all year, and it was a hobby that brought us all closer together. Plants and horticulture are not valued in our society-economically or culturally, probably because of the industrial food system and how we can just go to any grocery store at any time of night and get any type of food-packaged, pressed, and injected with chemicals-yum! But what can we do? This is our reality-"vegan" or organic food or whatever people wish to market it as, are just that much more expensive, and there is still that central and inherent denaturalization element-we do not produce what we make, instead we sell our labor/time-there is something isolating about the worker being isolated from this final product (as Marx pointed out).
    People against cannabis often argue that cannabis produces ineffective/random results in different people...this is correct to an extent, but consider the method people use for cannabis, the majority of cannabis is consumed haphazardly by untrained amateurs through trial and error-and this cannabis is bought from random sources, untested, no growing procedures ect. Of course this produces a wide array of results...I am proud of my country (Canada) as we have just fully legalized weed, and now that removes the barriers for science...I'm hoping in the next decade I will see Canadian scientists testing, formulating, and marketing forms of cannabis directly synthesized for various issues, including sleeping, menstrual/muscle pain, mental illness ect. I want us to pioneer a better future, one that leaves big pharma behind.
    On that note-since I moved to the United Kingdom, I've noticed my sleep quality has decreased...sometimes I take to taking over the counter sleeping pills, not what I want to do. I feel big pharma breathing down my throat, all I want is my weed...
    I too learned to read better on cannabis, and write... A lot of the posts I wrote on this forum even, were written incredibly high. It helps take the anxiety I always feel with regards to writing, it feels softer; more sensual an activity, rather than a vigorous and fast-paced activity. Also, as an individual with autism-I suffer at times with hyper-focus, meaning I struggle to change the course of my focus or to pull my attention away from a thought or project, which is primarily why I struggle to sleep at night and induce a lot of my own anxiety...I love the distractibility weed brings.
  • Grre
    137

    I think it does have a lot to do with mindset and environment. The mind is always in flux, is it not? So at times, some mind altering substances, such as alcohol or marijuana, will affect you in different ways and at different times in your life. It also depends a lot (and this is understated in literature but unanimous with every marijuana user I know) on the method...bongs, vaping, edibles ... all induce different responses and feelings. Vaping for me is kind of "tedious" like you mentioned, it just feels kind of muted and fuzzy-I much prefer the intensity of edibles or the sudden rush of bongs.
  • Coben
    943
    Anything that shifts perception - learning a new language, meditation, intense physical activity, participating in another culture, drugs, working with animals, being nature - can change assumptions we have about reality, identity, relations, selves, morals, perception, ontology. We take things for granted and we often don't know those things.
  • Grre
    137

    I agree and love your point. Reality changing and subversive experiences are inherently important to better exploring and interacting with the world around us. Close minded and rigid thinking is, in my opinion, a great crime one can do oneself-our lives being meaningless and all, we must learn and experience all we can-we must always seek to overcome our subjective lives that we are so horribly tied to.
  • Pantagruel
    187
    I think that reality as we experience it is a construct. We are experiencing an interevolution of mind and matter. Sometimes loosening the categories can be informative.
  • Wallows
    9k
    If you understand medical marijuana use as self medicating, then your range of experience reports is going to be off the rails given diversity.

    Also the entourage effect is worth researching if you want to understand the whole reason why there are a gazillion strains out there of cannabis. It's MUCH more complex than THC only.

    Lastly, Israel is on the forefront of medical marijuana research. O vey!


    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entourage_effect
  • uncanni
    234
    I posted this in a new topic on Doug Ruskoff's essay, "Cannabis: Stealth Goddess," and mostly got negative, nasty, and dismissive responses. WTF is wrong with so many people on this forum????


    There are some of us for whom Cannabis stimulates deeper insight into whatever subject one is investigating, a relaxed capacity for self-reflexivity, a more secure grounding in one's own sense of authenticity in a phony, hypocritical world, deeper relationships with others and with self, and most importantly, an ethics of refraining from harming others. Rushkoff claims that Cannabis raises conscience.

    Here's a quotation:

    Cannabis will give you the greatest gifts she has to offer--but she wants something in return. She wants your soul.... In short, Cannabis raises consciousness, creates a relationship, and--immediately after its peak--forces a self-evaluation. That's the step that can't be avoided.... [T]he higher you go, the more intense a self-examination will be demanded once you crest....
    Paranoia is reserved for the elder, more experienced users--and at that, only the ones who both hear Cannabis's messages and repeatedly refuse to comply. Who in their right minds would change their lives to conform to what they were thinking when they were stoned?
    To put it most simply, pot stops time.... The lean-forward of your directed, intentional life ceases. You are still doing what you are doing, but the goal no longer exists. The simplest effect of this time-stoppage is to bring focus to the task at hand. There is no goal; there is only process.... The act in this moment is all there is....
    For those accustomed to avoiding life's more existential dilemmas by busying themselves with activity, this slipping out of sequential time can be enough to induce some serious psychic trauma. For them, to just be is hard enough. Especially if they've been avoiding who they are for a long while.
    Kids are immune to this effect.... Adults, however, make their own momentum.... Stoned, however, time stops. The self-generated momentum ceases, and whateer that motion was helping to hide comes to the surface.... Pot is a drug that requires a level of respect, trepidation and devotion that most people aren't prepared or expecting to give her.

    I'm interested in hearing from other members who use Cannabis to enhance their experiences or activities: reading, writing, philosophizing, relating to others, self-exploration and problem-solving, communing with nature, feeling physically/spiritually/emotionally better, etc.
    uncanni
  • Grre
    137
    I should have checked this forum last night when I was high! Looks like a good video, unfortunately right now currently in a contract law lecture...not the time and place for great metaphysical concepts. Will watch though and update on my thoughts re: it.


    I like the way you summarized that. Perhaps I should frame it on my wall?


    I know exactly what you are talking about. The amount of parochial posts and threads I've read on here is concerning for what is supposed to be a community of critical thinkers...if I see one more post lambasting social media or how silly youth are now ect.. I posted a thread a while back (also in the field of philosophy of mind) discussing concepts of neurodiversity and I was met with just backlash of disbelief in basic learning disabilities...no academic discussion.
    I will look into your essay you posted. I have a reading list a mile long and no time to do it; my days are overtaken by law law law, the only time I can allot to philosophy is in lecture; am not the type to be able to learn in a lecture hall so at least i can stay productive.
  • Pantagruel
    187

    Another tidbit you might find cool. After doing a lot of reading on cybernetics and neural nets, something struck me. Neural nets are "trained up" by a trial and error (or self-correcting but same thing) process of matching specific inputs to desired outputs. What this implies is that there must be "hidden connections" existing between specific data in our cognitive fields. In other words, the dimensions of our perception and/or cognition are much more limited than the actual dimensions in which events occur.

    So, in this context, you can really see how relaxing the constraints on cognition could potentially be very...enlightening.
  • Grre
    137
    I 100% agree, from-both a theoretical and experience how that could be true. Love the tidbit.

    Marijuana doesn't just "open" your mind in the cliche sense, I mean, it does, it lets you pay more attention to sensory input and all that-but for me at least, its a different way of operating my mind; it slows it down, but it also speeds it up; it lets me work through things in a different manner/light, especially when I really put my head to it (like a creative high brainstorming session)..in this way I think marijuana and other psychedelics can be especially effective in trauma therapy and working with other forms of neurodiversity; like with my autism. It slows my mind down enough to let me compute certain things (like enjoy watching television or youtube channels more)--and it lets you examine trauma/circumstances/"reality" in a different light, that, when it fades away, you can still remember and reflect on that perception and then work on replacing your current perception with your new one.

    Idk i'm just rambling here. but remember DRUGS R BAD and CAUSE SCHIZOPHRENIA duh BAD BAD BAD totally not the illicit nature of drugs...or the criminalization/stigma factor...or the lack of research...or the cause and effect---i was already fucking depressed and anxious before i took drugs...it didn't "heighten" my mental illness; and there's no way to prove that my mental illnesses wouldn't have progressed "worse" if I hadn't smoked during that time..sorry i just feel big pharma smirking right now...
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