• Wallows
    7k
    In epistemology, and more specifically, the sociology of knowledge, reflexivity refers to circular relationships between cause and effect, especially as embedded in human belief structures. A reflexive relationship is bidirectional with both the cause and the effect affecting one another in a relationship in which neither can be assigned as causes or effects.Wikipedia

    I am wondering if the concept of reflexivity is present in the field of philosophy. Perhaps Whitehead's claim that Western philosophy is footnotes to Plato is indicative of this concept present in philosophy, along with Hegel's dialectics.

    Any ideas and thoughts?
  • Wallows
    7k
    I want to guide the discussion towards ethics, which is always a popular topic. For example, I find Stoicism to be a highly reflexive ethical theory. Namely, the stoic ethos is always in response to some urge, desire, or pain. So too is Buddhism a reflexive doctrine of desire being the source of suffering, and hence desire must be limited and eventually eliminated.

    The only non-reflexive ethical theory that I am aware of is utilitarianism. The good is promoted on the basis of what is most fulfilling to not an individual; but, society as a whole.

    Ideas, thoughts?
  • Wallows
    7k
    Tiny bump.
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