• bloodninja
    309
    No Heidegger was simply saying something different, something that couldn't be reduced to Kantian/Husserlian "present-at-hand" ontology. Heidegger does not muddy present-at-hand ontology with existential concepts. You must understand this before you argue against him. His existential concepts have absolutely NOTHING to do with Kantian/Husserlian ontology!
  • waarala
    15


    It is interesting question though how the Heideggerian ontological existentials would "correspond" to Kantian epistemological categories. In some sense H. transforms Kant's epistemological transcendental subject into ontological being. So, Heidegger's project is from epistemology to ontology. Ontology (of dynamics (of "life")) with subject though (cf. early Husserl's intentionality + Dilthey's Life context (Lebenszusammenhang), Scheler's parallel project, Aristotle?) . Theoretically knowing subject becomes lived experience in the world. Husserl is hermeneutized and Dilthey ontologized (which results in "Existence" (Kierkegaard - Jaspers)). Existentials form the experience not to primarily produce "abstract" objects but significations or meaningful encounters in general. And everything happens or is "constituted" from "inside perspective" like in Kantian transcendental subject. Nothing is "created" here (idealism), there is always something already out there. This, which is out there encountered, becomes "interiorized" into a will driven world (Heidegger) not into a consciousness (Kant).
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