• guptanishank
    117
    A statement and it's opposite, obtained by applying the "not" operator, both cannot be true. The not operator is applied to the part of the sentence describing action or attribute.
    Example:
    a) The apple is red. The apple is not red.
    b) Swamy crossed over the fence. Swamy did not cross over the fence.

    I know it's not thorough, but I want to know if it's valid.
  • noAxioms
    508
    Technically, "Not (the apple is red)" or "not (Swamy crossed over the fence)"
    Is there a difference? Probably if there is no apple. The Not (the apple is red) is true, but The apple is not red isn't really true since there is no apple to be not red.
  • Kym
    86
    I think the term "valid" is usually reserved for an argument structure.

    But it's possible I am afflicted by opposing of states pedantry and accuracy.
  • guptanishank
    117
    Please ignore this. I should first go through formal logic.
  • Owen
    15

    Not (The apple is red) <-> The apple is not red, is not valid.
    It fails in the case of no apples...as you have noted.

    (Not (The apple is red) <-> The apple is not red) <-> (the apple)exists, is valid.
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