• Baden
    8.9k


    Looks good. On the list.
  • StreetlightX
    4.4k
    It's actually really, really good. It was originally published in 2014 but it's positively prophetic when read in the light of even just 5 years onward, and it really helps make sense of just so much that seems to be happening in the world. Basic idea is that the alliance between democracy and capitalism was only ever a post-war détente, and that since the 70s the two have been prying further and further apart, to the benefit of capitalism - much due to the mechanism of sovereign debt. It's a pretty impressive piece of scholarship.
  • Baden
    8.9k


    Right up my street. On mah kindle now. :strong:
  • 180 Proof
    453
    Die Philosophie der Erlösung, Phillip Mainländer [rough, unpublished, english translation]

    The Color of Money, Mehrsa Baradaran
    Serotonin, Michel Houellebecq
    Flow Down Like Silver, Ki Longfellow
    The Secret Magdelene, Ki Longfellow
    Why Trust Science?, Naomi Oreskes
    The Color of Law, Richard Rothstein**
    Understanding Consciousness, Max Velmans

    @Bitter Crank Thanks!**
  • Valentinus
    625
    Memoirs of Hadrian, Marguerite Yourcenar
    Various bits by Judith Shklar, particularly the Liberalism of Fear.
    Works of Love, Soren Kierkegaard.

    I didn't intend it to be so but they are oddly related.
  • Maw
    1.6k
    • The Color of Money, Mehrsa Baradaran180 Proof

    Heard wonderful things about this
  • 180 Proof
    453
    You've heard right. (A third of the way in it feels like I've read it before though.)
  • Pantagruel
    414
    Finished the R.G. Collingwood.

    The last chapter, on philosophy as literature, really is world class and worth reading on its own.

    Finally get to start Popper's trilogy postscript to the logic of scientific discovery: Volume 1 - Realism and the Aim of Science.
  • Amity
    950
    Essay on Philosophical Method" - R.G. Collingwood, underway...[now finished]Pantagruel
    The last chapter, on philosophy as literature, really is world class and worth reading on its own.Pantagruel

    I noticed your reference to it here:
    https://thephilosophyforum.com/discussion/7179/opposing-perspectives-of-truth

    It has good reviews, including your own. Might be tempted...
  • Pantagruel
    414
    It's all good, but everything really converges in the last two chapters, so a very rewarding read.
  • Pantagruel
    414
    I didn't intend it to be so but they are oddly related.Valentinus

    I always take that as a good sign that I am learning the right things....
  • Amity
    950
    Memoirs of Hadrian, Marguerite Yourcenar
    Various bits by Judith Shklar, particularly the Liberalism of Fear.
    Works of Love, Soren Kierkegaard.

    I didn't intend it to be so but they are oddly related.
    Valentinus

    How so ?
  • Pantagruel
    414
    That my intuitions are sound, that I have taken away good information. I have often selected books from a variety of fields and found strong thematic connections. In one sense not surprising as my choice is based on what I have already read.
  • Amity
    950


    Yes, I understand that we tend to choose books related to our interests.
    I have sometimes lived dangerously :naughty: and gone for the opposite to my usual :gasp:

    I was asking @Valentinus why his books were oddly related.
  • Valentinus
    625

    The first book I listed is a fiction, presenting an emperor musing on the best kind of Empire to shape.

    The second is a series of essays arguing that we need to place the effort to oppose cruelty and the usurpation of publicly granted powers over the articulation of what is the best polity.

    The third book explores the command to love one another in terms of personal responsibility. As a manual, if you will, it is not based upon establishing what is secular versus the sacred but having those distinctions come out of the awareness of what love requires. It doesn't oppose previous arguments from Augustine and the Scholastics but sort of turns them inside out.

    So what oddly connects them are their interests in expressing what a community is or not. A desire to know what to do next.
  • StreetlightX
    4.4k
    Yanis Varoufakis - The Global Minotaur: America, Europe and the Future of the Global Economy
    Yanis Varoufakis - And the Weak Suffer What They Must? Europe's Crisis and America's Economic Future
  • 180 Proof
    453
    The Demon in the Machine, Paul Davies
    The Rationality Quotient, Keith Stanovich, et al

    :up:
  • Amity
    950
    The first book I listed is a fiction, presenting an emperor musing on the best kind of Empire to shape.Valentinus

    Thanks for further explanation.
    Of the 3, the first sounds most like my cuppa tea.

    Memoirs of Hadrian, Marguerite Yourcenar.
    According to wiki:
    The book takes the form of a letter to Hadrian's adoptive grandson and eventual successor "Mark" (Marcus Aurelius). The emperor meditates on military triumphs, love of poetry and music, philosophy, and his passion for his lover Antinous, all in a manner similar to Gustave Flaubert's "melancholy of the antique world."

    Great reviews on goodreads site. This really appealed to me until I read this from academic Mary Beard:
    ..Hadrian is the kind of political leader whose behaviour seems distinctly recognisable, whose ambitions and conflicts we can almost share.
    That feeling of familiarity has been boosted by Marguerite Yourcenar's fictional, pseudo-autobiography of the emperor, Memoirs of Hadrian. Published in 1951, and once hugely popular (it now seems to me rambling and frankly unreadable), it took the modern reader inside Hadrian's psyche - presenting the emperor as a troubled and intimate friend, in much the same way as Robert Graves made the emperor Claudius a rather jolly great-uncle. 
    — Mary Beard
    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2008/jul/19/history
    [ my bolds ]

    Hmmm. Do you think this simply reflects the annoyance of a serious historian towards a fictionalised account. A misrepresentation; putting words put into Hadrian's his mouth that weren't his. And then any subsequent requotes by readers...fake.

    It can't be 'frankly unreadable' if so many have read it !
  • Valentinus
    625

    It is pretty obvious that one is hearing what Yourcenar thinks during the book more than a transcription of what Hadrian thinks. I happen to be interested in what Yourcenar thinks.

    I understand why the whole enterprise might piss off an actual historian who has read all the source material. I benefited from reading Mary Beard's SPQR.

    I always took the pleasure of historical fiction without mixing it up with the real thing. Other readers' aesthetics may bring different results. I do think Yourcenar is a better story teller than Graves in regards to presenting a Roman character of the kind presented by Beard's work.
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