• Robert Lockhart
    155
    I’ve heard of a recently proposed theory relating to the subject of moral knowledge, admittedly in its current form very speculative, which, based on the idea that the human perception of moral values cannot be accounted for fundamentally in terms of those cerebral processes, such as intellectual reasoning, of which the brain is known to be capable, concludes that such perception if it be possible may therefore act to provide objective evidence indicative that there exists an element involved in certain types of human understanding which is extra – neural in nature, with all that this would then imply.

    Among many speculative ideas, the theory involves the contentious claim that moral values are objective in nature, and not idiosyncratic to individuals, but the reasoning and the implications involved are nonetheless quite fascinating.
  • T Clark
    3.8k
    based on the idea that the human perception of moral values cannot be accounted for fundamentally in terms of those cerebral processes, such as intellectual reasoning, of which the brain is known to be capable,Robert Lockhart

    Of course I'm pretty skeptical, but you've given us nothing to work with here, just that you heard of something that might do something. How about some more detail.
  • Robert Lockhart
    155
    Well, yes what I've described is very sketchy. The theory involves the idea of ancient pedigree that, concomitant with the material brain, there exists also a distinct and irreducable non-material mind, this being proposed as the fundamental agent of our moral awareness capable of enabling a type of insight not explicable in terms of the neural processes by which intellectual reasoning occurs and hence forcing a recourse to the idea of extra neural processes in order to account for such putative insight.
  • T Clark
    3.8k
    Well, yes what I've described is very sketchy. The theory involves the idea of ancient pedigree that, concomitant with the material brain, there exists also a distinct and irreducable non-material mind, this being proposed as the fundamental agent of our moral awareness capable of enabling a type of insight not explicable in terms of the neural processes by which intellectual reasoning occurs and hence forcing a recourse to the idea of extra neural processes in order to account for such putative insight.Robert Lockhart

    How is that different from what dualists have been saying for thousands of years? From your original post I had assumed that we are talking about physical evidence.
bold
italic
underline
strike
code
quote
ulist
image
url
mention
reveal
youtube
tweet
Add a Comment