• javi2541997
    3.5k


    I agree. The different cultures and languages of this world are that varied that is nearly impossible, or at least very difficult, to have a deep look on them.
    I have always been interested in Japanese culture and I read books and some stuff on the topic. But, I am not going to lie, language is a barrier regarding to understand Japanese people. Yet, I think it is worthy to at least have a look, without the necessity of being an expert.
    On the other hand, I am currently having a big interest in Greek culture and Balkan history. So, I appreciate your help to make me learn news things. Nonetheless, language and phonetics are still issues for me... the use of Albanian consonants seem to be complex, but worthy to try!

    We do not have umlaut in the vowels and our consonants are not so expressive. With the exception of the double RR, in perro. :smile:
  • TheMadMan
    208
    I have always been interested in Japanese culture and I read books and some stuff on the topic. But, I am not going to lie, language is a barrier regarding to understand Japanese people. Yet, I think it is worthy to at least have a look, without the necessity of being an expert.javi2541997

    Yeah me too. Although I don't study it directly but through zen history and philosophy. The older the texts are the more I feel there is a gap between the original meaning and the translation I read.
    That's why I find the Kyoto school philosophers and D. T. Suzuki very helpful on bridging that gap.

    On the other hand, I am currently having a big interest in Greek culture and Balkan history.javi2541997

    In Albanian history you might find the story of Gjergj Kastriot Skënderbeu most impressive:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3Qelvsi_5E&t=2s&ab_channel=KingsandGenerals
  • javi2541997
    3.5k
    That's why I find the Kyoto school philosophers and D. T. Suzuki very helpful on bridging that gap.TheMadMan

    Yeah, I agree. Asian philosophy - specifically regarding to zen or ethics - is impressive and it is pretty developed. What I do not understand is why it is underrated is the Western world. Some "philosophers" or "thinkers" consider their principles just to have fun in a "hippy mode"

    In Albanian history you might find the story of Gjergj Kastriot Skënderbeu most impressive:TheMadMan

    Thank you so much for that recommendation. I am a bit busy right now, but I promise I will see it later and comment later on! :up:
  • TheMadMan
    208
    What I do not understand is why it is underrated is the Western world. Some "philosophers" or "thinkers" consider their principles just to have fun in a "hippy mode"javi2541997

    If you ask me, its like the story of the fox and the "sour" grapes. Its hard to let go of western dualistic way of thinking and thats what zen requires. It wants to push beyond logic and arrive to what is. So they use the excuse of the "hippy mode" to discard it altogether.
    So when one does so, I just challenge them to read Keiji Nishitani and then call zen hippy :lol:
  • javi2541997
    3.5k
    If you ask me, its like the story of the fox and the "sour" grapes. Its hard to let go of western dualistic way of thinking and thats what zen requires. It wants to push beyond logic and arrive to what is. So they use the excuse of the "hippy mode" to discard it altogether.TheMadMan

    I agree. Western world cannot get rid of dualism and other metaphysical stuff... I think it is a shame because the world is not only centralised here. Tao Te Ching is important as much as Locke, for example.



    On the other hand, I saw the video of Skanderbeg.

    I am not an expert on Ottoman wars/time, but after seeing the video I do understand why he is considered a national hero in Albania. The commentator of the video explains pretty well how Skanderbeg defended Albanian frontier and territory but most important, how he acted with cleverness. It is impressive how in a small land, he survived the attacks of the overwhelming soldiers of Ottoman empire.

    Another interesting fact: Skanderbeg in Spanish is said Jorge Castriota (Albanian: Gjergj Kastrioti)
  • TheMadMan
    208
    Another interesting fact: Skanderbeg in Spanish is said Jorge Castriota (Albanian: Gjergj Kastrioti)javi2541997

    Yes, Gjergj Kastrioti is his real name. Skenderbeg is the name given by the ottomans, Skender+Beu(sire)
  • javi2541997
    3.5k
    Yes, Gjergj Kastrioti is his real name.TheMadMan

    I going to give it a try and pronounce both consonants and vowels:

    Gjergj: I guess it is similar to "George" and the J is silent, but the last gj is complex to me. I do not know if it is an accent or just consonants.

    Kastrioti: I pronounce it as "cÁstrioti" with a big accentuation in the vowel.

    I recorded my voice pronouncing the name! :smile:
    Attachment
    Gjergj Kastrioti.wav (1M)
  • TheMadMan
    208

    That was really good. You just need to remove the O in Gjergj. Kastrioti was spot on.
    Here's a Ytube short where the name is pronounced:
    https://www.youtube.com/shorts/3AB1Z9QmThU
  • javi2541997
    3.5k
    Thanks friend! To be honest, I enjoy learning these things. I appreciate your commitment to help me out to learn and discover facts about your language. :up:
  • TheMadMan
    208
    :up: My pleasure :up:
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