• Arkady
    761
    We needn't postulate a false dilemma between "US voters are smart" and "US voters are stupid." I'd also like it if tosspots (assuming that's something bad - I don't speak UK) lost by a country mile, but it's also important to keep in mind how the electoral college system works, and how the person elected to POTUS doesn't always reflect the will of (most of) the people.
  • tim wood
    2k
    how the electoral college system works,Arkady
    Or in this case did not work. It's the business of the college to overrule the voters when in their judgment the voter's judgment needs overruling. That they did not, and at the time there were news reports that suggested that some college members wanted to, suggests a significant failure of the system. It takes courage to stand against the crowd; they didn't have it, even when the popular vote was for Clinton.
  • Arkady
    761
    Some states have laws mandating that their electors vote for the candidate that received the most electoral votes. I believe that electors voting for someone else is a rare occurrence, and I don't know to what extent such laws have been challenged in court. States are generally given broad latitude to run their elections as they see fit (even moreso in the light of the recent Supreme Court decision striking down provisions of the Voting Rights Act), but I don't know if such elector laws would be adjudicated to fall within the states' purview to conduct elections. If not, they could potentially be struck down.
  • tim wood
    2k
    This is no simple subject. But notwithstanding any law - and I believe the states control their electors - I cannot imagine any elector accepting the notion that his or her vote was purely a rubber stamp and nothing else. Pretty clearly almost all understand that crossing the popular vote is an invitation for trouble, but as I understand their purpose for being, it is exactly to take on that trouble, when and if it seems the better course.Arkady
  • S
    8.6k
    ...suggests a significant failure of the system.tim wood

    You could add a whole load of stuff to complete that sentence. The U.S. needs a revolution.
  • Rank Amateur
    1.5k
    The base debate at the creation of the US was the role/power of the the Central government in relation to the power of the individual states. The creation of the electoral college was in relation to this. The less populated states feared that the heavily populated states could dominate a popular election and thereby impose undo power on the less populated states. The electoral college was a way to mitigate that imbalance.
  • S
    8.6k
    The base debate at the creation of the US was the role/power of the the Central government in relation to the power of the individual states. The creation of the electoral college was in relation to this. The less populated states feared that the heavily populated states could dominate a popular election and thereby impose undo power on the less populated states. The electoral college was a way to mitigate that imbalance.Rank Amateur

    Nevertheless, look what has happened. Clearly it has faults which warrant going back to the drawing board.
  • frank
    2.3k
    The New Zealand and Austrailian nazis need to settle down.
  • Relativist
    513
    FYI - In 2016 there were 10 "faithless electors" who tried to vote against the candidate to whom they were pledged. 3 of these votes were invalidated, and 7 of them were validated. This Wikipedia article has the details.
  • Anaxagoras
    118


    Not so easy considering that white nationalism is a growing problem.
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