• Jamal
    5k
    In the early nineties I worked at IBM in Greenock. For lunch and dinner the canteen provided a nice range of food but a large portion of the workforce had exactly the same thing every day: pie and chips*. This was baffling to me but at the same time it fitted with Scotland’s reputation as a nation of unhealthy eaters in which all vegetables except potatoes are never seen.

    * For non-Brits who might be reading this, “pie” refers here to scotch pie, which is a high-energy mutton pie.
  • universeness
    2.9k

    In the LATE nineties, I worked at WA in Greenock, (aka Wellington Academy). For lunch and 'breaktime,' the canteen (aka food hall) provided a very limited range of cheap food, but a large portion of the pupils had exactly the same thing every day, scotch pie, chips and beans. This was perfectly reasonable to me as it fitted with Scotland's cunning plan to take over the world by producing many children who saw people who ate vegetables as 'consumable,' if minced and placed inside a scotch pie.
    A pupil or teacher could get themselves beat up for using such 'weirdo words' as vegetable!
    Oh how I miss those colourful crazy dazes.
  • Baden
    13.5k
    When I worked at Mc O'Soft (the now defunct Irish software company) in the MID nineties, pretty much everyone ate Guinness for lunch. That was the only vegetable available. (Maybe there were potatoes for dessert but no one ever remembered dessert.)
  • Michael
    11.8k
    Maybe there were potatoesBaden

    Pretty sure there weren't.
  • universeness
    2.9k
    potatoes for dessertBaden

    Now surely that's a deeply philosophical quote!

    "Desert in philosophy is the condition of being deserving of something, whether good or bad. It is a concept often associated with justice: that good deeds should be rewarded and evil deeds punished."

    Does 'potatoes for desSert' exemplify the moral dilemma of what blurs the line between good and evil deeds? Or maybe I just drink too much Guinness, (a pleasant little porter!) when there is no more whiskey in the jar

    Lest we forget!
  • Janus
    12.8k
    :up: Sounds good, I'm gonna try it...
  • Hanover
    8.8k
    In the LATE 90s, when I worked at a major insurance company denying benefits to whining injured people, I would eat at a Korean run soul food restaurant every day for $5 a plate, which was about 1000 calories per dollar. I'd wash it down with sweet tea that doubled as maple syrup during breakfast hours.

    My favorite part of those days was capitalizing the word "late."
  • Hanover
    8.8k
    Love that tune, especially Metallica's version:

  • Jamal
    5k
    Sounds good, I'm gonna try it..Janus

    I've thought long and hard about which ingredients are essential, which non-essential. In a nutshell, it's far and away best with all the ingredients, but if you had to do without something it would have to be the pomegranate or apple. The magic for me centres around the feta, olives, yellow pepper, and parsley.
  • universeness
    2.9k
    Love that tune, especially Metallica's version:Hanover

    Yeah, I agree, one of the best ever. Most will get up to dance or sing along or move their feet to that one.

    It's a very old song:

    The song's exact origins are unknown. A number of its lines and the general plot resemble those of a contemporary broadside ballad "Patrick Fleming" (also called "Patrick Flemmen he was a Valiant Soldier") about Irish highwayman Patrick Fleming, who was executed in 1650.

    In the book The Folk Songs of North America, folk music historian Alan Lomax suggests that the song originated in the 17th century, and (based on plot similarities) that John Gay's 1728 The Beggar's Opera was inspired by Gay hearing an Irish ballad-monger singing "Whiskey in the Jar". In regard to the history of the song, Lomax states, "The folk of seventeenth century Britain liked and admired their local highwaymen; and in Ireland (or Scotland) where the gentlemen of the roads robbed English landlords, they were regarded as national patriots. Such feelings inspired this rollicking ballad."

    At some point, the song came to the United States and was a favourite in Colonial America because of its irreverent attitude toward British officials. The American versions are sometimes set in America and deal with American characters. One such version, from Massachusetts, is about Alan McCollister, an Irish-American soldier who is sentenced to death by hanging for robbing British officials.

    The song appeared in a form close to its modern version in a precursor called "The Sporting Hero, or, Whiskey in the Bar" in a mid-1850s broadsheet.

    The song collector Colm Ó Lochlainn, in his book Irish Street Ballads, described how his mother learnt "Whiskey in the Jar" in Limerick in 1870 from a man called Buckley who came from Cork. When Ó Lochlainn included the song in Irish Street Ballads, he wrote down the lyrics from memory as he had learnt them from his mother. He called the song "There's Whiskey in the Jar", and the lyrics are virtually identical to the version that was used by Irish bands in the 1960s such as the Dubliners. The Ó Lochlainn version refers to the "far fam'd Kerry mountain" rather than the Cork and Kerry mountains, as appears in some versions.

    The song also appears under the title "There's Whiskey in the Jar" in the Joyce collection, but that only includes the melody line without any lyrics. Versions of the song were collected in the 1920s in Northern Ireland by song collector Sam Henry. It is Roud Folk Song Index no. 533
  • universeness
    2.9k
    Just listened to the new album from MUSE, 'Will of the people,' really good, but the anti-life people and the 'doomsters,' will especially like the last track, "We are all fucking fucked" :lol:
    I decided against my normal use of f****** f***** or fasterisk fasterisked, as I did not want to dilute the words of the fantastic MUSE!
  • Tzeentch
    1.9k
    Flagged another post by accident :cry:
  • javi2541997
    2.2k
    Flagged another post by accidentTzeentch

    Now, we will take a revenge and start flagging all your posts :rofl: :naughty:
  • Tate
    1.4k
    I've thought long and hard about which ingredients are essential, which non-essential. In a nutshell, it's far and away best with all the ingredients, but if you had to do without something it would have to be the pomegranate or apple. The magic for me centres around the feta, olives, yellow pepper, and parsley.Jamal

    I tried it with dried cranberries for pomegranate and brown rice for couscous. :up:
  • Xtrix
    4.1k
    In the early ninetiesJamal

    In the LATE ninetiesuniverseness

    in the MID ninetiesBaden

    In the LATE 90sHanover

    Jesus…how old are you people?

    :chin: :wink:
  • Bitter Crank
    11.1k
    Finished watching Ken Burns' "The U.S. and the Holocaust" on Public Broadcasting. It was very well done. Burns' style is very straightforward and the content is dense but well presented. It consists of three 2-hour segments.
  • Noble Dust
    6.1k


    In college I recorded Jay Ungar, Ken Burns soundtrack man, doing a live studio session in which he played fiddle, accompanied by a four piece. This was the EARLY TO LATE 90's.
  • universeness
    2.9k
    Jesus…how old are you people?Xtrix

    Why you asking Jesus?
  • universeness
    2.9k
    I tried it with dried cranberries for pomegranate and brown rice for couscous. :up:Tate

    Did you have a delicious bowl of deep-fried chipped potatoes on the side, with salt, vinegar and brown HP sauce?
  • Jamal
    5k
    I tried it with dried cranberries for pomegranate and brown rice for couscousTate

    I don't encourage innovation with this recipe but I imagine this might be quite good, so I'll let it pass.
  • javi2541997
    2.2k
    I wish I can understand Reddit moderators one day. I am posting basic grammar questions in "r/LearnJapanese" and the modteam always remove my posts because of being simple questions...
    I bet 150 € that the mods behind the hub are teenagers or even a worse an auto mod who is not working good.
  • unenlightened
    7k
    Jesus…how old are you people?
    — Xtrix

    Why you asking Jesus?
    universeness

    Jesus is even older than me. He's celebrating his 2022'nd birthday this year though he has entirely forgotten which day it was and exactly how many years old he is. Back in the fifties, I wouldn't have been allowed to say that.
  • universeness
    2.9k
    He's celebrating his 2022'nd birthday this year though he has entirely forgotten which day it was and exactly how many years old he is.unenlightened

    Well, it's not easy being your own father and asking yourself why hast thou forsaken me?
    I wonder if Jesus would prefer a nice bowl of crispy fat chips with salt and vinegar and HP brown sauce to @Jamals "I've thought long and hard about which ingredients are essential" bland sounding concoction?

    I wouldn't have been allowed to say that.unenlightened

    You might still go to hell! Do you think they will serve chips in hell? Please don't tell me we will all be force fed @Jamals concoctions! :scream:
  • Michael
    11.8k
    34

    Hmmm... I've known some people here for half my life. Weird.
  • T Clark
    9.8k
    I’ll share a recipe. I got it from a healthy eating recipe book I was given years ago. It’s a couscous salad and the combination of flavours is like magic, i.e., mysterious, surprising, and delightful.

    Couscous
    Pomegranate arils
    Feta cheese
    Apple
    Yellow pepper
    Black olives
    Parsley
    Jamal

    Here - this is my @Hanover impression:

    Well, I substituted macaroni for the couscous and Velveeta processed cheese product for the feta and then left the rest out. It was great!
  • Hanover
    8.8k
    Here - this is my Hanover impression:

    Well, I substituted macaroni for the couscous and Velveeta processed cheese product for the feta and then left the rest out. It was great!
    T Clark

    My wife has distilled the formula for all my jokes and sometimes she'll start telling what I think to be the funniest jokes I've ever heard, only for me to finally figure out she was being me.

    My point being that you're just like my wife. Where's my supper?
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